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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Fingerprints of Ongoing Human Evolution Found

Fingerprints of Ongoing Human Evolution Found

By | September 5, 2017

Genetic variants in Alzheimer’s- and smoking-related genes appear to be under selection pressure, according to a study comparing the genomes of old and young participants.

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Neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells fill in for lost dopamine neurons in a primate model of the disease.

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image: Global Patterns of Human Epigenetic Variation

Global Patterns of Human Epigenetic Variation

By | August 28, 2017

A study of five far-flung human populations gives clues to adaptations to environmental pressures.

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image: A Potential Remedy for the Aging Brain

A Potential Remedy for the Aging Brain

By | August 8, 2017

In mice, injected fragments of a naturally occurring protein boost memory in young and old animals and improve cognition and mobility in a model of neurodegenerative disease. 

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The genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don’t resolve the animals’ debated evolutionary story.

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A new method stimulates B cells to make human antigen-specific antibodies, obviating the need for vaccinating blood donors or hunting for rare B cells.

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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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image: Deep Brain Stimulation Without Surgery

Deep Brain Stimulation Without Surgery

By | June 1, 2017

Using interfering high-frequency currents applied to the surface of the mouse skull, scientists can noninvasively target brain regions buried below the cortical surface. 

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