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image: Science Setbacks: 2014

Science Setbacks: 2014

By | December 25, 2014

This year in life science was marked by paltry federal funding increases, revelations of sequence contamination, and onerous regulations.

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image: 2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

By | December 24, 2014

The best of The Scientist’s popular daily image posts

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image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.

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image: Platelets Fan Inflammation

Platelets Fan Inflammation

By | December 4, 2014

The circulating blood cells bind to neutrophils, prompting inflammation-related activity in these immune cell partners.

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image: Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

By | December 4, 2014

A carbohydrate antigen found on cells of E. coli and other species prompts a potent immune response against malaria-causing parasites in mice.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Species-Specific

Species-Specific

By | November 17, 2014

Scientists uncover striking differences between mouse and human gene expression across a variety of tissues.

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image: How a Memory Is Made

How a Memory Is Made

By | November 13, 2014

Transcription factor levels dictate which neurons in a network store a memory.

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image: Mind-Controlled Gene Expression

Mind-Controlled Gene Expression

By | November 11, 2014

A light-inducible optogenetic implant in mice, powered by EEG, responds to a human participant’s mental state.

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image: Myelin’s Role in Motor Learning

Myelin’s Role in Motor Learning

By | October 16, 2014

The production of new myelin in the brain—a function of non-neuronal glial cells—may be necessary for motor learning, a mouse study shows.

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