Advertisement
Ingenuity
Ingenuity

Most Recent

image: Interspecies RNA Shuffle

Interspecies RNA Shuffle

By | August 14, 2014

Researchers report the first example of large-scale RNA-based communication between species—a parasitic plant and two of its hosts. 

2 Comments

image: Pregnancy Stress Spans Generations

Pregnancy Stress Spans Generations

By | August 7, 2014

The stressors a female rat experiences during pregnancy can have repercussions for her granddaughters, a study shows. 

2 Comments

image: Prepped for the Long Sleep

Prepped for the Long Sleep

By | July 30, 2014

Hibernation-related proteins are common even in non-hibernating animals, a study shows.

2 Comments

image: Gestational Malnutrition Affects Offspring’s Sperm

Gestational Malnutrition Affects Offspring’s Sperm

By | July 10, 2014

Mice undernourished during pregnancy can transmit the effects of such nutritional stress to their sons’ germ cells, epigenetically.  

0 Comments

image: Inherited Intelligence

Inherited Intelligence

By | July 10, 2014

Cognitive testing in chimpanzee pedigrees reveals a genetic basis for intelligence.

4 Comments

image: Mutations Pervade Mitochondrial DNA

Mutations Pervade Mitochondrial DNA

By | July 7, 2014

Pathogenic mutations in mitochondrial DNA are common in healthy people, according to a new study.

12 Comments

image: Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

By | June 25, 2014

E. coli repeatedly exposed to ampicillin adapt to stay dormant for longer periods of time—just long enough to outlast the antibiotic treatment.

1 Comment

image: Re-examining Rots

Re-examining Rots

By | June 23, 2014

Fungi that digest wood in novel ways could fuel new avenues of research on cellulosic ethanol, and suggest a need to move beyond traditional classification systems.  

1 Comment

image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

0 Comments

image: For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

By | May 29, 2014

Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.

2 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Life Technologies