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image: Human Proteome Mapped Again

Human Proteome Mapped Again

By | January 22, 2015

Researchers complete another interactive protein atlas, boosting the number of publicly available maps of human protein expression levels.

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image: Oxytocin for Autism?

Oxytocin for Autism?

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists find that the hormone improves sociability in a mouse model of autism.

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image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.

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image: The Year in Pathogens

The Year in Pathogens

By | December 29, 2014

Ebola, MERS, and enterovirus D68; polio eradication efforts; new regulations on potentially dangerous research

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image: 2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

By | December 24, 2014

The best of The Scientist’s popular daily image posts

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image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.

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image: Reprogramming Redux

Reprogramming Redux

By | December 18, 2014

Can mechanical forces alone be manipulated to create stem-like cells?

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image: Platelets Fan Inflammation

Platelets Fan Inflammation

By | December 4, 2014

The circulating blood cells bind to neutrophils, prompting inflammation-related activity in these immune cell partners.

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image: Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

By | December 4, 2014

A carbohydrate antigen found on cells of E. coli and other species prompts a potent immune response against malaria-causing parasites in mice.

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image: New Piece of a Mysterious Channel

New Piece of a Mysterious Channel

By | November 25, 2014

Researchers have nailed down yet another component of the mechanotransduction complex responsible for relaying signals from hair cells in the ear.

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