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Instant evolution

By | April 7, 2011

Bacteria infect an invasive pest species, rapidly transforming the bugs' development and reproduction

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News in a nutshell

By | April 7, 2011

New microbe species discovered in Antarctica; the NIH readies for a government shutdown; dinosaur lice

2 Comments

Eyes grown from stem cells

By | April 6, 2011

Cultured mouse embryonic stem cells self-organize into a complex retinal structure

5 Comments

Top 7 in genetics and genomics

By | April 5, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in genetics and genomics, from Faculty of 1000

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Announcing The Scientist's Labbies

By | April 4, 2011

Enter your science video, website, or multimedia for a chance to win this year's multimedia awards!

3 Comments

Salamander cells harbor algae

By | April 4, 2011

For the first time, scientists identify algae living inside the cells of a vertebrate, but what are they doing there?

3 Comments

Medical posters as art

By | April 1, 2011

A new exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art celebrates the slick design of old public health messages and pharmaceutical ads

2 Comments

Behavior brief

By | March 31, 2011

A round up of recent discoveries in behavior research

2 Comments

Evolution outside the lab

By | March 31, 2011

Bacteria and their parasitic phages evolve just as quickly in a natural soil community as they do in a test tube, but other selective pressures can influence the changes

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News in a nutshell

By | March 31, 2011

Venter admits misquoting Feynman in synthetic DNA; in vitro Parkinson's; immune modulator for melanoma wins US approval

1 Comment

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