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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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An examination of 17 ancient skulls shows that some Neanderthal features arose as far back as 430,000 years ago.

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image: Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

By | June 18, 2014

Microroboticists have designed simple sensors based on insect light organs called ocelli to stabilize a miniature flying robot.

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Scientists generate tumor-targeting molecules that can be used for imaging and treatment.

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image: Light-Sensing Retina in a Dish

Light-Sensing Retina in a Dish

By | June 10, 2014

From human induced pluripotent stem cells, researchers grow 3-D retinal tissue that can sense light. 

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Minimal Toolkit for Stem Cell Self-Renewal

Minimal Toolkit for Stem Cell Self-Renewal

By | June 5, 2014

Researchers identify a network of a dozen transcription factors needed to maintain the pluripotent state of mouse embryonic stem cells. 

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image: Activating Beige Fat

Activating Beige Fat

By | June 5, 2014

An innate immune pathway stimulates the activity of heat-producing adipose tissue in mice.

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image: How Malnutrition Affects the Microbiome

How Malnutrition Affects the Microbiome

By | June 4, 2014

The gut bacterial communities of severely malnourished children appear to be less developed than those of healthy children, a study on Bangladeshi infants and toddlers finds.

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image: Engineered Microbe Could Ease Switch to Grass

Engineered Microbe Could Ease Switch to Grass

By | June 2, 2014

Researchers modify a heat-loving bacterium so it can produce biofuel from switchgrass directly, with no need for costly chemical and enzymatic treatments.

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