Most Recent

image: Surrogate Genes Enable Reproduction

Surrogate Genes Enable Reproduction

By | January 28, 2016

Increasing the expression of two genes from non-Y chromosomes restores spermatogenesis in male mice that lack Y chromosomes.

2 Comments

image: Schizophrenia and the Synapse

Schizophrenia and the Synapse

By | January 27, 2016

Genetic evidence suggests that overactive synaptic pruning drives development of schizophrenia.

5 Comments

image: Another Role for ApoE?

Another Role for ApoE?

By | January 20, 2016

Key Alzheimer’s disease–related protein may be a transcriptional regulator.

3 Comments

image: Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

By | January 4, 2016

A gene-expression signature correlates with a person’s likelihood of experiencing adverse events after receiving a seasonal flu vaccine, scientists show. 

0 Comments

image: Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

By | December 21, 2015

The selection of traits suitable for human companionship may have dragged along some unfavorable alleles.

2 Comments

image: Constant Evolution

Constant Evolution

By | December 16, 2015

Bacteria growing in an unchanging environment continue to adapt indefinitely.

10 Comments

image: Let’s Talk Human Engineering

Let’s Talk Human Engineering

By | December 3, 2015

Experts continue to discuss the logistics and ethical considerations of editing human genomes at a historic meeting in Washington, DC. 

7 Comments

image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

1 Comment

image: Blood-Gut Barrier

Blood-Gut Barrier

By | November 12, 2015

Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.

0 Comments

image: New Route to Hearing Loss Mapped

New Route to Hearing Loss Mapped

By | November 5, 2015

Deficiency in a protein called pejvakin makes inner ear cells more vulnerable to sound, unable to brace themselves against oxidative stress stimulated by noise. 

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. NYU Halts Studies, Suspends Investigator
    The Nutshell NYU Halts Studies, Suspends Investigator

    Experiments conducted at the New York University School of Medicine violated several research standards, according to US Food and Drug Administration investigators.

  2. Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory
  3. The Meaning of Pupil Dilation
    Daily News The Meaning of Pupil Dilation

    Scientists are using pupil measurements to study a wide range of psychological processes and to get a glimpse into the mind.

  4. Brexit’s Effects on Science