Research round-up

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Seeing traits, close-up

By | November 7, 2005

Researchers dissect a quantitative trait to the single nucleotide level

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A flavor for fat?

By | November 2, 2005

Scientists identify the first candidate taste receptor for lipids in rodents

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Clues to cell death in ALS

By | November 1, 2005

Aggregations of misfolded proteins foretell cell death in ALS model

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Gene fusion identified in prostate cancer

By | October 28, 2005

Find is unusual in solid tumors, typically characterized solely by random genetic changes

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Red, fights, and blue

By | October 27, 2005

UK biologists spar over whether evolutionary psychology explains why wearing a colored uniform can give sportsmen a competitive edge

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Phase I of HapMap Complete

By | October 26, 2005

International consortium publishes most comprehensive catalog of human genetic variation to date

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XX mouse cell instability explained

By | October 24, 2005

Study suggests XX murine stem cells are under-methylated, shedding light on X chromosome activation

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New migration, new species

By | October 21, 2005

Study suggests songbirds are choosing mates that share a new migration path, splitting one group into two

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Non-coding DNA adapts

By | October 20, 2005

Drosophila non-coding DNA exhibits both negative and positive selection

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Getting on top, genetically

By | October 18, 2005

Study shows rapid genetic response to social opportunity in cichlid fish

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Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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