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ProteinSimple
ProteinSimple

Research round-up

Most Recent

New control over worm rhythms

By | October 10, 2005

Newly discovered gene controls swallowing, ovulation, and defecation

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New clues to nerve regeneration

By | October 7, 2005

Blocking a growth factor receptor allows damaged axons to re-grow, providing new clues to why nerves typically don't heal

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Flu genome sequenced

By | October 6, 2005

Papers were published despite concerns the findings could aid bioterrorism

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Sexual communication in tears

By | October 6, 2005

Non-volatile sexual "pheromone" found in mouse tears may play a role in close-range, face-to-face communication

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'Dead' DNA feeds deep sea life

By | October 5, 2005

Extracellular DNA plays a pivotal role in deep-sea ecosystems, researchers report in Science

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Bats might be origin of SARS

By | September 30, 2005

Findings suggest winged mammals could spread SARS-like viruses across Asia, Australia and Europe

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Bacteria may have endless diversity

By | September 28, 2005

Comparative sequencing reveals enormous variation in genomes from horizontal gene transfer

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Research funding doubles in decade

By | September 22, 2005

Public, private support for biomedical research tops $94 billion, shifts further down pipeline

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Nanotubes link immune cells

By | September 20, 2005

Naturally occurring structures could help deliver signals and antigens more rapidly than other means

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Tumor malignancy linked to rigidity

By | September 19, 2005

These findings could help explain why cells on plastic dishes transform, lead to new anticancer drugs

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Horizon Discovery
Horizon Discovery

Popular Now

  1. The Mycobiome
    Features The Mycobiome

    The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

  2. Antibody Alternatives
    Features Antibody Alternatives

    Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

  3. Simulating Scientific Sabotage, For Fun
  4. Holding Their Ground
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    To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

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