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Research round-up

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Sigmoidoscopy discomfort

June 27, 2000

NEW YORK, June 27 (Praxis Press) Physicians often cite patient discomfort as a reason for not requesting screening flexible sigmoidoscopy. Patient experiences and attitudes toward sigmoidoscopy, however, have not been well studied. To measure patient satisfaction with screening sigmoidoscopy, Schoen and colleagues surveyed 1221 patients after sigmoidoscopy (see paper). They found that more than 93% of the participants strongly agreed or agreed they would be willing to undergo another examination

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Thrombosis treatment

June 27, 2000

NEW YORK, June 27 (Praxis Press) Heparins have been shown to be effective and safe in the treatment of deep vein thrombosis, but the use of this treatment on an outpatient versus an inpatient basis has not been compared. To compare the two treatment locales, Boccalon and colleagues conducted a randomized, comparative, multicenter trial and evaluated the clinical outcomes and treatment costs (see paper). The researchers examined 201 patients with proximal deep vein thrombosis and administered low

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Colposcopy guidelines

June 26, 2000

NEW YORK, June 26 (Praxis Press) Currently no guidelines exist for managing women with low grade cytological abnormalities, whose findings on colposcopy do not warrant immediate treatment. To develop an evidence-based protocol for these women, Teale and colleagues evaluated 566 women with low-grade cytological abnormalities who were not treated at a first visit to the colposcopy clinic, and followed them for a total of 881 years (see paper). Abnormalities resolved in 306 (54.1%) women, whereas 1

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NEW YORK, June 26 (Praxis Press) Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common complication of iron-overload diseases such as hereditary hemochromatosis. Recently a gene mutation was identified that strongly predisposes individuals towards hemochromatosis when present in homozygous form. Salonen and colleagues examined whether a carrier status for the mutation predicts the development of type 2 diabetes (see paper). Out of a total of 555 participants, one was homozygous and 34 heterozygous for the HFE C2

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Consider quantifying levels of HPV DNA in women at high risk of cervical cancer.

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Consider follow-up measurement of cardiac troponin T is patients with chest pain.

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Statins and osteoporosis

June 26, 2000

NEW YORK, June 26 (Praxis Press) Experimental evidence has shown that the cholesterol-lowering statin drugs may increase bone formation. Chan and colleagues undertook a population-based case-control study at six health-maintenance organizations in the USA to investigate the relationship between statin use and fracture risk among older women. They selected 928 women over 60 years of age who had non-pathological fracture of the hip, humerus, distal tibia, wrist, or vertebrae and compared their sta

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Stomach cancer risk

June 26, 2000

NEW YORK, June 26 (Praxis Press) Stomach cancer is thought to result from Helicobacter pylori infection, most common where socioeconomic conditions are poor. Leon and colleagues have found that mortality from stomach cancer among 65-74 year old men correlates with infant mortality in 27 countries and that the two factors are strongly related (see editorial, or paper). To perform the analysis the researchers obtained death rates from stomach cancer and other causes from a database of the World He

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Acute chest syndrome

June 23, 2000

NEW YORK, June 23 (Praxis Press) Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death among patients with sickle cell disease, but its cause is largely unknown. To determine the cause of acute chest syndrome and its response to therapy, Vichinsky and colleagues performed a study of 671 episodes of the acute chest syndrome in 538 patients with sickle cell disease. They found that among patients with sickle cell disease, acute chest syndrome is commonly precipitated by fat embolism and infection, es

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NEW YORK, June 22 (Praxis Press) Exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure improves work capacity, but effects on central hemodynamic function are not well established. Hambrecht and colleagues assigned 73 men younger than 70 with chronic heart failure to an exercise program or to a physically inactive control group (see paper). For the first 2 weeks of the program, participants exercised on a bicycle ergometer for 10 minutes four to six times a day under hospital supervision. For

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