Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews

Research round-up

Most Recent

Anxiety treatment

June 21, 2000

NEW YORK, June 21 (Praxis Press) A common disorder known as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) lasts for a period of six months or more, but it is unknown whether the long term-use of a drug used to treat this disorder, venlafaxine XR (brand name Effexor), is safe or effective. A new study has found that venlafaxine XR is an effective for both the short- and long-term treatment of anxiety. Venlafaxine XR may be useful for the long-term treatment of GAD.

0 Comments

Venlafaxine and GAD

June 21, 2000

NEW YORK, June 21 (Praxis Press) Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with debilitating psychic and somatic symptoms. Previous studies have found that Venlafaxine extended-release (XR) capsules are effective in short-term treatment of patients with GAD, but without major depressive disorder (MDD). It is unclear, however, whether venlafaxine XR confers long-term benefits. Gelenberg and colleagues compared the 6-month efficacy and safety of a flexible dosage of venlafaxine XR in 251 o

0 Comments

NEW YORK, June 20 (Praxis Press) A type of fat found in the blood, called triglyceride, has been linked to heart disease for years, but its exact role in heart disease is unclear compared to other risk factors, such as high cholesterol, A study has shown that in families with a disorder that raises levels of fats in the blood, people with elevated triglycerides are at increased risk of having a heart attack-even when their cholesterol levels are normal. High triglyceride levels may be an import

0 Comments

NEW YORK, June 20 (Praxis Press) Criteria for deciding whether patients with hyperkalemia should be treated in a hospital or as an outpatient have not been well established. Charytan and colleagues examined the current practices regarding hospitalization of patients with hyperkalemia and evaluated the criteria for admission. To perform the study they evaluated 11 patients hospitalized for hyperkalemia and compared them to 12 patients with a similar degree of hyperkalemia who were treated as outp

0 Comments

NEW YORK, June 20 (Praxis Press) Lyme disease typically presents with a skin lesion called erythema migrans (EM), which may be confused with cellulitis. The first-generation cephalosporin, cephalexin monohydrate, is effective for treating bacterial cellulitis but has not been recommended or studied for treating Lyme disease. In order to describe the outcome of patients with EM when treated with cephalexin, Nowakowski and colleagues evaluated 393 patients with Lyme disease, 11 of whom were treate

0 Comments

MMSE test and Alzheimer

June 20, 2000

NEW YORK, June 20 (Praxis Press) The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is a widely used diagnostic tool for dementia, but its use as a predictive indicator of Alzheimer disease (AD) has not been established. Tierney and colleagues performed a study to determine the accuracy of the MMSE in predicting emergent AD patients. They also evaluated the accuracy and usefulness of an abbreviated version of the MMSE. Researchers examined 183 participants with symptoms suggestive of memory impairment and

0 Comments

NEW YORK, June 20 (Praxis Press) Obstructive lung disease (OLD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality, but potentially treatable mild cases of OLD may often go undetected. To determine the national estimates of reported OLD and low lung function in the US adult population Mannino and colleagues examined data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) surveying 20,050 participants(see paper). Overall a mean of 6.8% of the population had low lung functi

0 Comments

Warfarin and hemorrhage

June 20, 2000

NEW YORK, June 20 (Praxis Press) The major toxic effect of warfarin sodium therapy is hemorrhage, the risk of which increases with the international normalized ratio (INR) value. To examine the relationship between INR values and hemorrhage, the researchers evaluated the rate of major hemorrhage and the rate of INR decay in patients undergoing warfarin sodium therapy. Hylek and colleagues evaluated 114 patients with INRs greater than 6.0 and compared them with 268 patients with INRs in the targ

0 Comments

White-coat normotension

June 20, 2000

NEW YORK, June 20 (Praxis Press) Differences between ambulatory (ABP) and office blood pressure (OBP) measurements have brought attention to the problem of misdiagnoses. Although studies have focused on white-coat hypertension (elevated OBP with normal ABP means), few studies have examined "white-coat normotension" (WCN; normal OBP with elevated ABP means). To quantitate the difference in blood pressure readings in WCN and to characterize the prevalence of WCN, Selenta and colleagues monitored 3

0 Comments

NEW YORK, June 20 (Praxis Press) Women are underdiagnosed and undertreated for heart disease and stroke and their risk factors. To assess knowledge and perceptions of risks of heart disease and stroke among women in the United States, Mosca and colleagues conducted telephone surveys of US households, including an oversample of African American and Hispanic women. Out of 1000 participants, 25 years and older, only 8% of the respondents identified heart disease and stroke as their greatest health

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies