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Biotech market will rebound

By | June 13, 2002

Biotech investment banker predicts market will rebound and tips systems biology as hot area for investment.

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Cloning steps sideways

By | June 13, 2002

Short on votes, US Senate cloning opponent considers proposing a two-year moratorium.

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Royal Society called to account

By | June 13, 2002

Resignation of COPUS head prompts MPs to ask whether Royal Society has obstructed development of the body.

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African AIDS Vaccine Programme launched

By | June 12, 2002

New initiative aims to develop a vaccine against the HIV subtype most prevalent in Africa.

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Animal instincts

By | June 11, 2002

British scientists warn pressure to halt the use of GM animals in research could stall medical progress

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Universal bioinformatics system

By | June 11, 2002

I3C hopes to make identifying and tracking genes and proteins easier, and to encourage open-source software in bioinformatics.

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Anti-GMF movement 'dysfunctional'

By | June 10, 2002

Former Greenpeace director opens BIO 2002 conference with a scathing attack on group's antiscientific approach.

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Max Perutz Awards 2002

By | May 30, 2002

Annual essay prizes go to those scientists who can explain the nub of their work.

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Prime Minister champions science

By | May 24, 2002

Tony Blair discussed the importance of science to society at The Royal Society yesterday.

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US genome sequencing priorities decided

By | May 24, 2002

The chicken genome will be among the next to be sequenced, and so will that of humanity's closest relative.

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