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US expands smallpox vaccine plans

By | July 9, 2002

As many as 500,000 health care and emergency workers could receive vaccine.

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Former HHMI officer dies

By | July 8, 2002

Neurobiologist W. Maxwell Cowan dies aged 70.

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New director at CDC

By | July 4, 2002

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention appoints Julie Gerberding, MD, first woman to head agency.

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More public funds needed for research

By | July 1, 2002

A new report concludes that recent improvements in the competitiveness of UK research will only be maintained by increased funding.

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Kyoto Prize 2002

By | June 27, 2002

Leroy Hood recognized for his contribution to the development of the technology that enabled rapid genome sequencing.

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Aventis Science Book Prizes 2002

By | June 26, 2002

Stephen Hawking announces his return to the literary sphere by winning the 'Science Booker'.

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Cry freedom

By | June 26, 2002

Scientists' ability to publish research and share findings remains under threat from planned UK legislation.

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US bioethics council meets

By | June 24, 2002

Presidential advisory group likely to release final report by summer's end.

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A Nobel cause

By | June 21, 2002

Six Nobel laureates demand EU action to stem the brain drain to the US.

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No mass smallpox vaccination in US

By | June 21, 2002

Advisory committee votes unanimously against universal vaccination; first responders will receive vaccine.

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