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Nicotine promotes tumour growth and atherosclerosis

By | July 3, 2001

Treatment for nicotine addiction may be as harmful as smoking, as nicotine seems to promote angiogenesis and tumour formation.

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Degrading mutations

By | July 2, 2001

Mutations in matrix metalloproteases have been detected in inherited osteolytic and arthritic disorder.

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Minor histocompatibility antigen has anti-leukaemic role

By | July 2, 2001

have curative anti-leukaemia activity through a graft-versus-leukaemia effect with no graft-versus-host disease.

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Pollen coat protein gene families

By | July 2, 2001

Clusters of pollen coat protein genes could help define species and prevent non-specific pollination.

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Id and aging

By | June 29, 2001

The Id1 protein inhibits cell senescence by repressing cell-cycle genes.

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Nitric oxide holds the key to firefly glow

By | June 29, 2001

Nitric oxide was once regarded simply as a noxious pollutant. But its ever expanding functional repertoire may now include generation of firefly luminescence.

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TNF signalling in rheumatoid arthritis

By | June 29, 2001

Blocking tumour necrosis factor ligands inhibits both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms in a model of rheumatoid arthritis.

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Crenarchaeon genome

By | June 28, 2001

Sulfolobus solfataricus is a model organism for the study of the crenarchaeal branch of the Archaea. It is remarkable for its optimal growth conditions: 80oC and pH 2-4, metabolizing sulfur. In the July 3 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, She et al. report completion of the genome sequence of S. solfataricus by a Canadian-European collaborative project (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:7835-7840). The genome is almost 3 megabases long on a single chromosome and encodes 2977 protein

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ICOS role in suppressing organ rejection

By | June 28, 2001

An ICOS blockade suppresses intragraft T cell activation and cytokine expression and prolongs transplant survival.

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Signals in inflammation resolution

By | June 28, 2001

generated early in inflammation acts as an inducer of subsequent anti-inflammatory pathways partly by amplification of lipoxin expression.

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