News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Human cloning debate in the US rages on

By | August 8, 2001

Ahead of an upcoming Senate vote on human cloning, the announcement by an Italian embryologist of his plans to clone a human has further polarised the debate in the US.

0 Comments

Lipocalin killer

By | August 8, 2001

In the August 3 Science, Laxminarayana Devireddy and colleagues from the University of Massachusetts Medical School report the use of DNA microarrays to identify genes whose expresssion is induced during apoptosis (Science 2001, 293:829-834). They studied cell death of a mouse pro-B lymphocytic cell line upon withdrawl of interleukin-3. The gene that showed the largest induction (12.6-fold) was 24p3, which encodes a lipocalin. Lipocalins are small secreted proteins, and Devireddy et al. found th

0 Comments

Ink and Arf

By | August 7, 2001

When primary murine fibroblasts are placed in culture they exhibit replicative senescence, associated with the induction of cell-cycle inhibitors. The Ink4a-Arf locus encodes two proteins, p16Ink4a and p19Arf, which regulate the cell cycle by modulating the activities of pRb and p53, respectively. In the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Randle et al. describe the role of p19Arf in preventing immortalization of bone-marrow-derived preB cells and macrophages (P

0 Comments

Sand fly saliva spits out Leishmania vaccine

By | August 7, 2001

A DNA vaccine derived from a sand fly saliva protein could protect against vector borne parasitic diseases.

0 Comments

Two-hybrid assay in plants

By | August 7, 2001

protein-fragment complementation assay can monitor protein-protein interactions in living plant cells.

0 Comments

Myotonic expansion

By | August 6, 2001

Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy. DM Type 1 caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase (DMPK) gene. In the August 3 Science, Christina Liquori and colleagues from the University of Minnesota report that DM2 is also caused by microsatellite expansion in non-coding sequences (Science 2001, 293:864-867). While characterizing the DM2 locus on chromosome 13q21, Liquori et al. discovered an exp

0 Comments

Perfect murder

By | August 6, 2001

In the August issue of Nature Biotechnology, Francesca Sotrici and colleagues from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences describe how to commit the perfect murder (Nature Biotechnology 2001, 19:773-776). "Delitto perfetto" (Italian for perfect murder) is the name they gave to a two-step, cloning-free, technique that creates desired mutations, be they simple nucleotide replacements, precise insertions or large deletions. The first step involves integration of a counterselectable

0 Comments

Putting the sea into cancer therapy

By | August 3, 2001

Tampering with the nucleotide excision DNA repair mechanism creates lethal breaks in the DNA and can kill cancerous cells.

0 Comments

Adiponectin reverses insulin resistance

By | August 2, 2001

Adiponectin, a natural substance secreted by fat cells, appears to reverse the effects of insulin resistance and to lower blood glucose levels.

0 Comments

Antibodies could combat prion-based diseases

By | August 2, 2001

The discovery that antibodies seem to be effective against prions could open the door to immunisation against spongiform encephalopathies.

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Teknova
Teknova
Advertisement
Life Technologies