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Sonic hedgehog maintains adult stomach structure

By | August 22, 2001

In adult tissues Shh is a negative regulator of gastric gland cell proliferation and controls the expression of gut epithelial differentiation.

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Telomerase helps mend broken hearts

By | August 22, 2001

Cardiac muscle regeneration after injury is limited by 'irreversible' cell cycle exit via down-regulation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). In the August 21 online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Hidemasa Oh and colleagues from the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, show that mice genetically engineered to overexpress TERT produce more and bigger cardiac myocytes, which live longer than those in normal mice.Oh et al. modified mice to express TER

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Charities and governments tackle clinical research crisis

By | August 21, 2001

New initiatives in the UK and US aim to create an environment more conducive to enabling doctors to train as 'physician-scientists'.

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Copper shows mettle in preventing food poisoning

By | August 21, 2001

Using copper surfaces for food preparation could reduce the risk of food poisoning.

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Polar fish provide biological antifreeze molecules

By | August 21, 2001

Synthetic analogues of antifreeze glycoproteins could be used to prolong the 'shelf-life' of organs awaiting transplant.

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Tumor suppression by FEZ

By | August 21, 2001

The FEZ1 protein regulates mitosis and tumor cell proliferation.

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Making sense of antisense

By | August 20, 2001

DNA microarray analysis has been used to define gene-expression profiles following treatment with antisense oligonucleotides.

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HIV confuses specific B cell subset

By | August 17, 2001

Antibody-producing B cells begin to malfunction early after infection with HIV, for reasons that are poorly understood. In August 14 on-line Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Susan Moir and colleagues from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, US show that HIV viremia induces the appearance of a subset of B cells whose function is impaired and which may be responsible for the hypergammaglobulinemia associated with HIV disease.Moir et al. studied the funct

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Humans easier to clone than sheep

By | August 17, 2001

In humans genomic imprinting for M6P/IGF2R is absent suggesting that humans could be technically easier to clone than sheep and other nonprimates.

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Proof of trans-splicing

By | August 17, 2001

It has been proposed that isoforms of Drosophila mod(mdg4) result from the trans-splicing of independent mRNA transcripts derived from both anti-parallel DNA strands. In the August 14 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Rainer Dorn and researchers at the Martin Luther University, Halle, Germany, provide proof for trans-splicing of mod(mdg4) transcripts in transgenic flies (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:9724-9729).They characterized 26 different classes of mod(mdg4) transcripts all

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