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Histone modification in heterochromatin

By | February 25, 2002

The spatial organization of pericentric chromatin is established by histone acetylation and methylation, and involves an RNA component.

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Kidneys shaped

By | February 25, 2002

Polycystin-1 C-terminal fragment triggers branching morphogenesis and migration of tubular kidney epithelial cells.

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Resistance to antiangiogenic cancer therapy

By | February 25, 2002

Angiogenesis inhibitors are potent anticancer drugs thought to lack acquired drug resistance problems because they target the normal endothelial cells of the tumor vasculature. But, in February 22 Science, Joanne Yu and colleagues from University of Toronto, Canada, show that p53 loss in tumor cells confers a resistance to hypoxia that might reduce the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy.Yu et al. compared the response to antiangiogenetic therapy of tumors derived from paired isogenic p53-/- and

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Copy cat

By | February 22, 2002

A whole menagerie of animals (including sheep, mice, cattle, goats and pigs) have been cloned by transfer of nuclear genetic material into an enucleated cell. Now, in an Advanced Online Publication from Nature,Taeyoung Shin and colleagues demonstrate that cats (Felis domesticus) can be cloned too (Nature 2002, DOI: 10.1038/nature723).Shin et al. isolated fibroblasts from the oral mucosa of an adult male cat or primary cumulus cell cultures and fused them with enucleated cat ova; they then implan

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Public consultation needed on xenotransplants

By | February 22, 2002

A session on xenotransplantation at the AAAS this week highlighted the need for urgent public consultation.

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Saving stressed sperm

By | February 22, 2002

Heme oxygenase-1 derived from Leydig cells in the testis regulates apoptosis of premeiotic spermatocytes in response to stress.

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Taming Toxoplasma

By | February 22, 2002

pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway.

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Interferon cells revealed

By | February 21, 2002

by a specific subset of dendritic cells in the absence of feedback signaling.

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The other yeast genome

By | February 21, 2002

In the February 21 Nature, an international consortium of laboratories, led by the British Nobel laureate Paul Nurse, reports the complete sequence of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Nature 2002, 415:871-880).The depth of sequence coverage was about eight-fold. The three chromosomes make up a 13.8 Mb genome, which is similar in size to that of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, but considerably smaller than the other sequenced eukaryotic genomes (fruitfly, nematode worm, human and Ara

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Yeast genome should provide insights to human disease

By | February 21, 2002

The fission yeast genome contains 50 genes with similarity to genes involved in human diseases.

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