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The other yeast genome

By | February 21, 2002

In the February 21 Nature, an international consortium of laboratories, led by the British Nobel laureate Paul Nurse, reports the complete sequence of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Nature 2002, 415:871-880).The depth of sequence coverage was about eight-fold. The three chromosomes make up a 13.8 Mb genome, which is similar in size to that of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, but considerably smaller than the other sequenced eukaryotic genomes (fruitfly, nematode worm, human and Ara

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Yeast genome should provide insights to human disease

By | February 21, 2002

The fission yeast genome contains 50 genes with similarity to genes involved in human diseases.

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Shaping gene expression

By | February 20, 2002

Cell shape has a dramatic influence on the organization of the cell and its genetic program. In the February 19 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Carson Thomas and colleagues describe a method to investigate the link between nuclear shape and gene expression (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2002, 99:1972-1977).Thomas et al. studied primary osteogenic cells and measured changes in the expression of genes encoding differentiation markers, such as type I collagen and osteocalcin. They control

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Complementary and alternative therapies under the spotlight

By | February 19, 2002

Investigations into complementary and alternative medicine therapies presented at the AAAS throw up surprising results.

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Stress-induced recombination

By | February 19, 2002

The stress of pathogenic attack can stimulate somatic recombination in plants.

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Chromosome conformation

By | February 18, 2002

In the February 15 Science, Dekker et al. describe an ingenious high-throughput method to analyse the spatial organization and physical properties of whole chromosomes (Science 2002, 295:1306-1311).They call their technique 'chromosome conformation capture' (3C); it involves the isolation of intact nuclei, followed by formaldehyde fixation which causes cross-linking of genomic segments that are in contact via their DNA-bound proteins. The cross-linking frequencies can then be measured by restric

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Gonococcal immune suppression

By | February 18, 2002

Patients infected with Neisseria gonorrhoea present with intense inflammation resulting in urethral or cervical pus discharge, but the specific immune response to the bacteria is weak and does not protect against subsequent gonococcal infections. In February 19 online Nature Immunology, Ian Boulton and Scott Gray-Owen from University of Toronto, Canada, show that N. gonorrhoea have a mechanism that can arrest the activation and proliferation of CD4+ T lymphocytes via the CEACAM1 adhesion molecul

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Cash boost for research access

By | February 15, 2002

The campaign for freedom of access to scientific research has been given a $3 million boost.

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Diagnosing cancer with artificial neural networks

By | February 15, 2002

Artificial neural networks can efficiently distinguish human subtypes of neoplastic colorectal lesions.

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Viruses on the brain

By | February 15, 2002

Viral delivery of Cre recombinase can result in genetic engineering in the nervous system of adult mice.

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