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Dealing with damage

By | June 24, 2002

Genes induced by DNA-damaging agents appear not to be those required for survival.

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Fighting cancer from first principles

By | June 24, 2002

Tiam1 and Efp are involved in the cell cycle and the development of skin and breast tumors.

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Stem cells live long and prosper

By | June 24, 2002

Overexpression of hTERT in human bone marrow stem cells increases their life span and osteogenic potential.

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US bioethics council meets

By | June 24, 2002

Presidential advisory group likely to release final report by summer's end.

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A Nobel cause

By | June 21, 2002

Six Nobel laureates demand EU action to stem the brain drain to the US.

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Masters of the mitochondria

By | June 21, 2002

Two mitochondrial proteins have been found to control transcription of mitochondrial DNA.

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No mass smallpox vaccination in US

By | June 21, 2002

Advisory committee votes unanimously against universal vaccination; first responders will receive vaccine.

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Stem cells to the fore again

By | June 21, 2002

Two papers show promise for adult stem cells and for mouse ES cells in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

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Operons in worms

By | June 20, 2002

Operons contain multiple adjacent genes whose transcription is regulated by the transcription of a single polycistronic message. The processing of polycistronic pre-mRNA involves 3' end formation and trans-splicing by the specialized SL2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle. In the June 20 Nature, Thomas Blumenthal and colleagues describe a screen for SL2-containing mRNAs in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome (Nature 2002, 417:851-854).Blumenthal et al. used a probe enriched for SL2-containin

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Ripening on the vine

By | June 20, 2002

Polyamines play an important role in fruit ripening by enhancing phytonutrient content, juice quality and vine life.

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