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Targeted destruction

By | July 24, 2001

Synthetic chimeric molecules can be used to target proteins for ubiquitin-dependent degradation.

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Pneumococcus genome

By | July 23, 2001

Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) was the bacterial strain used in the historic studies of Avery, MacLeod and McCarty more than half a century ago to demonstrate that DNA is the material of inheritance. The Gram-positive bacterium causes over 3 million infant deaths each year from pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis. In the July 20 Science, Tettelin and colleagues from The Institute for Genome Research (TIGR) report the complete genome sequence of S. pneumoniae (Science 2001, 293:498-506)

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Prion detection in peripheral tissues

By | July 20, 2001

A firm diagnosis of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (vCJD) is difficult to make because it is based on distinguishing misfolded prion proteins (PrPSc) from normally folded prion proteins in human brain biopsies. In 20 July issue of the Lancet, Wadsworth and colleagues from Imperial College School of Medicine, London, UK, describe a new technique based on a highly sensitive immunoblotting assay that can accurately detect PrPSc in peripheral tissue in patients suspected of vCJD. Wadsworth et al.

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Ras controls herpes virus penetration in cells

By | July 20, 2001

Oncogenes in Ras signalling pathway are essential in host-cell permissiveness to herpes simplex virus 1.

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Actin checkpoint

By | July 19, 2001

Mitotic segregation of chromosomes depends on correct assembly of the bipolar spindle and mitosis is delayed by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). In the July 19 Nature, Gachet et al., at the National Institute for Medical Research and University College London, describe a different mitotic checkpoint in yeast (Nature 2001, 412:352-355). They investigated the link between organization of the actin cytoskeleton and the cell cycle in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. They synchroniz

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Custom-made human embryos for medical research

By | July 19, 2001

Scientists in the US have created stem cells from human embryos derived from germ cells donated explicitly for providing tissue for medical research.

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BRCA2-repair

By | July 18, 2001

Mutations in the human BRCA2 gene are associated with susceptibility to early-onset breast cancer, but it is unclear how the wild-type BRCA2 protein works. In the July 17 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Xia et al. describe investigation of the role of BRCA2 in DNA repair (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:8644-8649). They expressed BRCA2 in Capan-1 carcinoma cells, the only human cell line that has non-functional BRCA2. BRCA2 expression increased homologous recombination ten-fold,

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New light on seasonal variation in infection outbreaks

By | July 18, 2001

Seasonal cycles of infectious diseases are universal and no single theory based on pathogen appearance, disappearance, or environmental changes has proved satisfactory. In June Emerging Infectious Diseases Scott Dowell of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta suggests a novel theory, saying that the seasonal variation in infectious disease outbreaks are related to changes in host susceptibility mediated by the annual light/dark cycle and patterns of melatonin secretion. Dr Do

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Modified two-hybrid

By | July 17, 2001

The yeast two-hybrid system is one of the most widely used functional genomic tools for studying protein-protein interactions. But transcriptional activators cannot be used as 'bait' proteins in the assay as they can activate the reporter gene, usually used as an indicator of protein interaction, even in the absence of protein interactions. In the July 17 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Hirst et al. describe a modified two-hybrid assay that is based on transcriptional repression

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c-Jun N-terminal kinase role in rheumatoid arthritis

By | July 16, 2001

The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is a critical convergent point in metalloproteinase expression and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis.

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Mettler Toledo
Mettler Toledo
Life Technologies