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Mucus hypoxia promotes infection in cystic fibrosis

By | February 6, 2002

infection of the airways.

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The death of Max Perutz

By | February 6, 2002

The Nobel prizewinner and eminent biologist Max Perutz has died.

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Blood vessels grow from adult bone marrow

By | February 5, 2002

Adult bone marrow stem cells can develop into endothelial cells and contribute to neoangiogenesis.

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Immunosuppressive drug protects against cancer

By | February 5, 2002

Treatment with rapamycin reduces primary and metastatic tumor growth.

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Is corporate funding steering research institutions off track?

By | February 5, 2002

As a senior researcher defends his involvement with both Enron and ImClone, we assess the conflicts of interest that can attend corporate funding of research.

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The riddle of the pharynx

By | February 5, 2002

The pharynx of Caenorhabditis elegans is a neuromuscular organ responsible for pumping food in from the environment and for initiating digestion. Organogenesis of the pharynx involves complex patterning and morphogenesis events, and the differentiation of distinct precursor cells. In the February 1 Science, Gaudet and Mango from the University of Utah report a genomic analysis of the role of the PHA-4 protein, a homologue of the forkhead box A (FoxA/HNF3) transcription factor involved in pharyng

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Breast cancer prognosis

By | February 4, 2002

No-one really understands why some women with breast cancer respond well to chemotherapy while others do not, or how to predict an individual patient's chances of survival. In the January 31 Nature, Laura van't Veer and colleagues describe a gene-expression profiling study of breast tumors (Nature 2002, 415:530-536).They chose around 100 primary breast cancers (with and without metastases or BRCA1 mutations) and looked at the relative expression levels of 25,000 genes. They used a three-step sup

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Growth factor receptor signals intestinal tumor development

By | February 4, 2002

Epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) is an important molecule in the development of many organs, but its role in cancerous growth remains unclear. In January 29 online Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Reade Roberts and colleagues from Vanderbilt University, Nashville, US, show that Egfr signaling is required for development of intestinal tumors in mice.Roberts et al. used the hypomorphic Egfrwa2 allele to examine the impact of impaired Egfr signaling on the ApcMin mouse model

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BLAST off

By | February 1, 2002

Molecular biologists using Apple computers can receive a speed boost if they use an optimized version of BLAST and the new Mac operating system OS X on a Macintosh G4. The new version of BLAST, called A/G BLAST, was engineered by Apple's Advanced Computation Group in conjunction with Genentech and was announced on 29 January at the O'Reilly Bioinformatics Technology Conference in Tucson Arizona. A/G BLAST is optimized to take advantage of the G4 processor's Altivec or 'Velocity Engine' component

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Fertile ground for gene therapy

By | February 1, 2002

Sertoli cells are essential for spermatogenesis because of their interactions with germ cells, and a defect in their function can lead to the absence of spermatozoa (azoospermia) and male infertility. In January 29 online Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Mito Kanatsu-Shinohara and colleagues from Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan, show that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery into Sertoli cells of infertile mice could successfully restore production of fer

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