Advertisement
QIAGEN Ingenuity
QIAGEN Ingenuity

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Better intelligence for the battle of the bulge

By | January 8, 2002

Identification of the factor that stimulates fat cell development could help fight obesity and diabetes.

0 Comments

Deadly termite trap

By | January 8, 2002

A carnivorous pitcher plant uses a fringe of edible white hairs to lure and trap termites in large numbers.

0 Comments

GM pigs could fill transplant gap

By | January 8, 2002

Genetically modified pigs could provide organs for transplant that are not rejected by the immune system.

0 Comments

Variation on the fourth

By | January 8, 2002

The fourth chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster was believed to be free from variation and meiotic recombination, leading to several theories about its selection and evolution. In the January 4 Science, Wen Wang and researchers at the University of Chicago challenge these theories with their discovery of regions of variation along the chromosome (Science 2002, 295:134-137).They analysed nucleotide sequence around the toy gene locus from many fly collections worldwide. The observation that there

0 Comments

Damage in worms

By | January 7, 2002

Combined functional genomics approaches help to identify novel genes involved in the DNA damage response pathway in nematodes.

0 Comments

p53 controls ageing

By | January 7, 2002

The p53 protein works to suppress cancer cells by the induction of senescence, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but its role in the longevity of organisms remains unknown. In 3 January Nature, Stuart Tyner and colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA, show that p53 has a role in controlling ageing in mice.Tyner et al. generated mice with a mutation that confers phenotypes consistent with activated p53. They found that mutated mice are highly resistant to tumors but display early

0 Comments

Uncoupling protection

By | January 7, 2002

Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are molecules that usually generate heat in the mitochondria of brown adipose tissue, but their function in other tissues remains unclear. In 3 January Nature, Karim Echtay and colleagues from the Medical Research Council's Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, UK, show that UCPs may have a role in decreasing reactive oxygen species concentrations inside mitochondria.Echtay et al. observed that superoxide increases mitochondrial proton conductance through effects on UC

0 Comments

A surprising substitution

By | January 4, 2002

Transcription factor component JunB, although less active than Jun, has the potential to substitute functionally for Jun.

0 Comments

Evidence that the heart can regenerate

By | January 4, 2002

Undifferentiated host cells can migrate to host donor tissue in transplanted hearts.

0 Comments

Monkey map

By | January 4, 2002

Following the completed draft of the human genome sequence, there is renewed interest in the genetic differences between species and, particularly, in what makes us human. In 4 January Science, Asao Fujiyama and colleagues at the RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Japan present a first-generation human-chimpanzee comparative genome map (Science 2002, 295:131-134).They used over 77,000 chimp bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) and aligned end-sequences with the human genomic sequence. The BAC clon

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy
  2. The Two Faces of Fish Oil
    Notebook The Two Faces of Fish Oil

    The discovery of a tumor-protecting role for a fatty acid found in fish oil has sparked debate about the product’s safety.

  3. Locating Language within the Brain
  4. Brain Keeps Watch During Sleep
Advertisement
Gilson
Gilson
Advertisement