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defect in Huntington's disease

By | July 2, 2002

In Huntington's disease mutant huntingtin protein has a direct effect on mitochondria, causing calcium handling defects.

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Targeting human transgenes

By | July 2, 2002

Adeno-associated virus vectors can be used for efficient transgene insertion into targeted loci in human cells.

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Don't turn off the light!

By | July 1, 2002

Diabetic patients could benefit from a modified cycle of sleep illumination in order to reduce oxygen consumption in the retina.

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IL-13 mediates asthma

By | July 1, 2002

Interleukin-13 acts directly on airway epithelial cells causing the hyperreactivity and mucus overproduction characteristic of asthma.

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Modified primers

By | July 1, 2002

A new technique for preparing fluorescent cDNA probes will allow microarray analysis of smaller RNA samples.

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More public funds needed for research

By | July 1, 2002

A new report concludes that recent improvements in the competitiveness of UK research will only be maintained by increased funding.

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Pill not linked to breast cancer

By | July 1, 2002

Oral contraceptive use is not associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer.

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Coffee kills

By | June 28, 2002

At high concentrations caffeine acts as a neurotoxin in slugs and snails.

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Placental imprinting

By | June 28, 2002

gene plays a critical role in regulating placental growth.

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VEGF keeps stem cells alive

By | June 28, 2002

Vascular endothelial growth factor controls haematopoietic stem cell survival by an internal autocrine loop mechanism.

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