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MS enzyme discovery points to novel treatment

By | May 28, 2002

Elevated levels of enzyme myelencephalon-specific protease in MS lesions could represent drug target.

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RAGE against arthritis

By | May 28, 2002

RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end-products) and its proinflammatory ligands are commonly identified in the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but their role in the disease has been unclear. In May Genes and Immunity, Hofmann and colleagues from Columbia University, New York, show that a polymorphism in the RAGE gene within the ligand-binding domain of the receptor (RAGE 82S) may contribute to enhanced proinflammatory mechanisms in immune/inflammatory diseases (Genes Immun

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'Power naps' in job description?

By | May 27, 2002

A short daytime nap may contribute to the consolidation of learning and improve performance in visual discrimination tasks.

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Oncogenic phosphatase amplification

By | May 27, 2002

Post-translational regulation of p53 regulates its activity and tumor suppressor functions. In an Advanced Online Publication in Nature Genetics, Dmitry Bulavin and colleagues from the National Institutes of Health describe how oncogenic Ras regulates p53 phosphorylation (Nat Genet 2002, DOI:10.1038/ng894).Bulavin et al. used antibodies specific for different modified forms of p53 and showed that oncogenic Ras induced p53, accumulation and phosphorylation of two specific serine residues that are

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Potential for muscle regeneration

By | May 27, 2002

A novel population of muscle stem cells from mice could hold the key to the treatment of muscle-wasting diseases.

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Haplotype blocks

By | May 24, 2002

Advances in medicine will undoubtedly be linked to our ability to correlate human genetic variation with disease. In the 23 May ScienceXpress, Stacey Gabriel and colleagues report a large-scale analysis of haplotypes in the human genome (Sciencexpress 2002, DOI:10.1126/science.1069424).Gabriel et al. characterized haplotype patterns for 51 genomic regions with an average size of 250 kb (covering 13 megabases) from African, European and Asian DNA samples. They genotyped thousands of single nucleo

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Prime Minister champions science

By | May 24, 2002

Tony Blair discussed the importance of science to society at The Royal Society yesterday.

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The time messenger

By | May 24, 2002

Most of the physiological and behavioral processes in mammals exhibit a daily rhythm, maintained by a central 'clock' in the brain, but the molecules that connect the brain clock with the body remain unknown. In 23 May Nature, Michelle Cheng and colleagues from University of California, Irvine, show that prokineticin 2, a cysteine-rich secreted protein, functions as an output molecule from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to the rest of the body.Cheng et al. studied mice under dark and light conditio

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US genome sequencing priorities decided

By | May 24, 2002

The chicken genome will be among the next to be sequenced, and so will that of humanity's closest relative.

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Manipulating mosquitoes and malaria

By | May 23, 2002

Malaria kills up to 2.7 million people a year and the death toll is predicted to double in the next two decades. In the 23 May Nature, Junitsu Ito and colleagues describe a transgenic strategy to halt malaria by regulating transmission by mosquitoes of the Plasmodium parasites that cause the disease(Nature 2002, 417:452-455).Ito et al. used the carboxypeptidase (CP) promoter that is activated by a blood meal, and CP signal sequences that direct protein secretion into the midgut lumen, to drive e

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