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How proteins come together

By | January 22, 2002

Specific amino acid substitutions favor protein aggregation by facilitating the assembly of partially denatured conformations.

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Hybrid vigor in rock pools

By | January 22, 2002

Excessive inbreeding can be deleterious to a population, resulting in inbreeding depression. Gene flow through metapopulations can be amplified by hybrid vigor, if the hybrid offspring of immigrants and residents have a competitive advantage. In the January 18 Science, Ebert et al. describe experiments that test this theory (Science 2002, 295:485-488).They studied the colonization and extinction dynamics of local populations of the water flea Daphnia magna in rock pools on islands along the Scan

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The leptin's way

By | January 22, 2002

Leptin stimulates fatty-acid oxidation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase.

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UK Court of Appeal agrees CNR clones are embryos

By | January 22, 2002

An Appeal Court ruling in the UK has clarified the law governing human cloning but pro-life campaigners will continue to test the regulations.

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Butterbur treats hay fever

By | January 21, 2002

A plant extract for treating seasonal allergic rhinitis circumvents the sedative side effects of antihistamines.

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chromosome staining

By | January 21, 2002

The chromosomal bands observed upon Giemsa staining are thought to correspond generally to regions that are GC-poor (Giemsa-dark, G bands) and GC-rich (Giemsa-light, R bands). But, the exact relationship between sequence base composition and cytogentic banding is remains unclear. In the January 22 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Niimura and Gojobori describe a computational method to explore the association between the Giemsa banding pattern and local GC content (Proc Natl Acad

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Tracking genes and disease

By | January 21, 2002

Plans to establish a UK gene bank reopen the debates on data transparency and patient confidentiality.

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'Flesh-eater' genome

By | January 18, 2002

Clostridium perfringens is the most widely distributed pathogen, and is a cause of gas gangrene, necrotic enteritis and diarrhoea. In the January 22 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Tohru Shumizu and colleagues report the genome sequence of C. perfringens strain 13, the first Gram-positive anaerobic pathogen to be completely sequenced (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2002, 99:996-1001).The genome is just over 3 Mb long, with a low G+C content (28.6%). They found 2660 predicted proteins, h

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Chloride's hourglass

By | January 18, 2002

The crystal structure of a chloride channel reveals an hourglass shape and provides clues as to their mechanism of action.

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Computer turns detective in the hunt for novel pathogens

By | January 18, 2002

A computational technique that finds foreign gene sequences in human tissues could identify pathogens that cause chronic diseases.

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