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Cardiac myocytes divide after myocardial infarction

By | June 8, 2001

The human adult heart has a subpopulation of myocytes that are not terminally differentiated and can start nuclear mitotic division early after infarction.

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Cracking Listeria's password

By | June 8, 2001

across the intestinal epithelial barrier.

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Genes modulated by Ginkgo biloba revealed by DNA microarrays

By | June 8, 2001

Millions of people take herbal remedies for conditions such as the common cold and Alzheimer's. A new approach may help to elucidate the mechanisms by which these compounds work in the body.

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pathogenesis

By | June 8, 2001

A computational approach is being used to identify disease-related regions in the mouse genome.

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Aspirin targets myeloid dendritic cells

By | June 7, 2001

effects useful for preventing transplant rejection.

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Hepatocyte growth factor controls bone marrow rejection

By | June 7, 2001

Hepatocyte growth factor ameliorates acute graft-versus-host disease and promotes hematopoietic function of donor cells.

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One potato, two potato

By | June 7, 2001

PCR analysis sheds light on the history of the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine.

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Protein Kinase C isozymes in colon carcinogenesis

By | June 6, 2001

Increased expression of protein kinase C inhibits anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, induces cellular differentiation and limits survival in human colon cancer cell lines.

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Snip-SNPs in the worm genome

By | June 6, 2001

SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) are valuable markers for mapping mutations and human disease-related genes. In the June issue of Nature Genetics, Wicks et al. describe a SNP-based strategy for rapid mapping in the C. elegans genome (Nature Genetics 2001, 28:160-164). They sequenced the entire genome of the CB4856 Hawaiian worm isolate and compared it with the standard laboratory wild type strain (Bristol N2). This alignment identified 6,222 potential polymorphisms, more than half of which

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Molecules affecting atherosclerotic disease progression

By | June 5, 2001

VCAM-1 has a dominant role in initiation of atherosclerosis but macrophage MMP-1 activity seems to limit the progression of disease.

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