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Perfect murder

By | August 6, 2001

In the August issue of Nature Biotechnology, Francesca Sotrici and colleagues from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences describe how to commit the perfect murder (Nature Biotechnology 2001, 19:773-776). "Delitto perfetto" (Italian for perfect murder) is the name they gave to a two-step, cloning-free, technique that creates desired mutations, be they simple nucleotide replacements, precise insertions or large deletions. The first step involves integration of a counterselectable

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Putting the sea into cancer therapy

By | August 3, 2001

Tampering with the nucleotide excision DNA repair mechanism creates lethal breaks in the DNA and can kill cancerous cells.

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Adiponectin reverses insulin resistance

By | August 2, 2001

Adiponectin, a natural substance secreted by fat cells, appears to reverse the effects of insulin resistance and to lower blood glucose levels.

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Antibodies could combat prion-based diseases

By | August 2, 2001

The discovery that antibodies seem to be effective against prions could open the door to immunisation against spongiform encephalopathies.

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Marine anticancer drug works by novel mechanism

By | August 2, 2001

A sea squirt extract is showing considerable promise in the treatment of a number of types of bone and soft-tissue cancers.

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a new class of AIDS drugs

By | August 1, 2001

As HIV continues to develop resistance to the present antiretrovirals a new class of drugs offer hope for the treatment of AIDS.

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Faces and races in the human brain

By | August 1, 2001

Same-race faces elicit more activity in brain regions linked to face recognition.

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Anti-viral role of natural small RNAs

By | July 31, 2001

A common processing machinery generates small RNAs that mediate both RNA interference and endogenous gene regulation.

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CpG receptors

By | July 31, 2001

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important for vertebrate recognition of pathogen-associated molecular forms. The receptor TLR9 is involved in the recognition of bacterial DNA by virtue of its unmethylated CpG dinucleotides. In the July 31 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Bauer et al. show that human TLR9 (hTLR9) confers responsiveness to CpG-DNA and differs from its mouse homologue (mTLR9) in CpG motif recognition (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:9237-9242). Immunostimulatory CpG

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Sinorhizobium meliloti

By | July 31, 2001

The sequencing of the genome of the bacteria involved in the rhizhobial symbiosis with alfalfa may help improve crop yields.

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