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Controlling protein folding

By | April 10, 2002

The mechanism by which a linear sequence of amino acids controls the folding of a protein into its unique three-dimensional structure remains incompletely understood. In April 8 online Nature Structural Biology, Christian Wigley and colleagues from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, show that a protein sequence can encode the native structure by disfavouring the formation of a misfolded structure.Wigley et al. observed that a proline residue in the center of the third trans

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Fate is genetic

By | April 10, 2002

The single-cell resolution (the sequence of mechanisms that establish cell lineages and cell fates during metazoan development) is a major aspect of animal development, but the specific genes involved remain unclear. In April 1 Development, Scott Cameron and colleagues from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas show that PAG-3, a Zn-finger transcription factor, determines neuroblast fate in Caenorhabditis elegans and is essential for development of the erythroid and megakaryocy

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Zooming in on micrometastases

By | April 10, 2002

Researchers have developed an optimized procedure for analyzing the genome and transcriptome of single tumour cells.

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Cloning like rabbits

By | April 9, 2002

French scientists have succeeded in generating cloned rabbits by nuclear transfer.

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The danger of misfolded proteins

By | April 9, 2002

Protein folding intermediates are cytotoxic, independent of cell damage caused by mature folded proteins.

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Thick skinned

By | April 9, 2002

Lipoid proteinosis is caused by mutations in the extracellular matrix protein 1 gene on chromosome 1q21.

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BAC to BAC

By | April 8, 2002

Spotting modified DNA directly onto untreated glass surfaces offers an efficient system for identifying genomic abnormalities in tumor samples.

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Bop controls ventricle formation

By | April 8, 2002

encodes a muscle-restricted protein essential for cardiac differentiation and right ventricle morphogenesis.

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primase inhibitors may treat herpes

By | April 8, 2002

primase inhibitors are orally available drugs active against herpes simplex virus.

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Send in the clones

By | April 8, 2002

The US patent office has waded in to the dispute over who was first to develop cloning technology.

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