Advertisement
ProteinSimple
ProteinSimple

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

PTEN profiling

By | November 7, 2001

Microarray analysis using an inducible expression system identifies genes regulated by the PTEN tumour suppressor.

0 Comments

T cells

By | November 7, 2001

2 T cells are sufficient to control bacterial infections in mice that lack B or T cells.

0 Comments

Improved anthrax vaccine

By | November 6, 2001

A new anthrax vaccine based on mutant forms of the bacterium's toxic proteins could be on the horizon.

0 Comments

More genes on the fly Y

By | November 6, 2001

The DrosophilaY chromosome has several features (including its heterochromatic state) that have made mapping and sequencing difficult. The Y chromosome contains genes directly involved with male fertility. In the November 6 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Antonio Carvalho and colleagues describe a search for more novel Y-linked genes (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:13225-13230).They used a strategy involving staggered TBLASTN screening of 500,000 proteins against the armU datab

0 Comments

Light-induced apoptosis

By | November 5, 2001

Exposure to light induces photoreceptor cell death and retinal degeneration in animal models. The absence of some genes (for example, arrestin or rhodopsin kinase) can sensitize the retina to light damage. In the November 6 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Sangdun Choi and researchers at the California Institute of Technology report the use of gene expression profiling to investigate light-induced apoptosis (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:13096-13101).They isolated retinal tissu

0 Comments

New mechanisms in HIV infection

By | November 5, 2001

HIV specific epitopes, human herpesvirus 6, and Nef proteins may be exploited for the production of an effective vaccine against AIDS.

0 Comments

Sanger Institute looks to the future

By | November 5, 2001

Following the completion of the first draft of the Human Genome the Sanger Institute looks to the post-genomic future.

0 Comments

a case of placement over policy?

By | November 2, 2001

The US anthrax outbreak has led to an unprecedented use of the antibiotic Cipro, but why not less precious drugs such as penicillin or doxycycline?

0 Comments

Hammerhead selection

By | November 2, 2001

Hammerhead ribozymes with self-cleaving properties have been found in a range of organisms, including plants, newts, schistosomes and cave crickets. In the i November Nature, Salahi-Ashtiani and Szostak of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital describe an in vitro system to address the origins of hammerhead ribozymes (Nature 2001, 413:82-84).They used a DNA collection encoding large random-sequence RNAs to select self-cleaving RNAs. Repeated rounds of selection l

0 Comments

Potassium ions move like Newton's balls

By | November 2, 2001

ion conduction mechanism across membranes.

0 Comments

Advertisement
Horizon Discovery
Horizon Discovery

Popular Now

  1. The Mycobiome
    Features The Mycobiome

    The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

  2. Antibody Alternatives
    Features Antibody Alternatives

    Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

  3. Simulating Scientific Sabotage, For Fun
  4. Holding Their Ground
    Features Holding Their Ground

    To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

Advertisement
Bertin Technologies
Bertin Technologies
Advertisement
Life Technologies