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Multigene family encoding malarial variance

By | April 17, 2001

may help explain how this malarial parasite maintains a chronic infection.

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Shear stress

By | April 17, 2001

The vascular endothelium is remarkably versatile in its ability to respond to both soluble chemical stimuli and mechanical stimuli. In the April 10 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Garcia-Cardena et al. report the results of a high-throughput genome-wide analysis of gene modulation by biomechanical activation (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:4478-4485). They used cDNA arrays to examine the effects of biomechnical forces on gene expression in cultured monolayers of human umbilical

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Cannabinoids and appetite

By | April 12, 2001

Mice in which the gene for the cannabinoid receptor has been knocked out eat less than normal.

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Mathematical predictions for foot and mouth disease

By | April 12, 2001

To evaluate the best tactics for fighting the current foot and mouth crisis in the UK, a team from Imperial College School of Medicine, London applied a mathematical model and calculated the potential for disease transmission, given different scenarios. In their report in 13 April Science online they show that rapid, pre-emptive ring culling of livestock surrounding the sites with infected animals is the best way to slow the epidemic.Ferguson et al fed the current epidemiological data into a mat

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More healing with stem cells

By | April 12, 2001

Intravenous infusion of bone-derived marrow stromal cells can enter the brain and reduce neurological functional deficits after stroke.

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Rehabilitation of brain function by relearning specific skills

By | April 12, 2001

Commonly, people who suffer attention deficits following brain injury due to trauma or stroke are treated using cognitive exercises designed to directly restore impaired attention processes.But Norman Park (Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto) and Janet Ingles (Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia) found that an alternative and lesser-used therapy may be more effective. They compared two different approaches to treatment. "One is restoration-training-based approach, which assumes you can re

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Genetic susceptibility of pre-eclampsia

By | April 11, 2001

A gene defect in the detoxifying enzyme epoxide hydrolase is associated with pre-eclampsia in pregnancy.

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New technology reduces the profitability for new drugs

By | April 11, 2001

The recent American College of Cardiology meeting provided a striking example of how the new technology of combinatorial chemistry is changing the face of the drugs market.

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Second-generation microarrays

By | April 11, 2001

Current microarray analysis uses 'chips' containing either 25-residue oligonucleotides synthesized by photolithography or cDNAs placed by robotic spotting. In the April Nature Biotechnology, Hughes et al. describe a microarray technique that exploits an ink-jet printing method and standard phosphoramidite chemistry (Nature Biotechnology 2001, 19:342-347). The ink-jet synthesizer can deliver 25,000 phosphoramidite-containing microdroplets to a 25 x 75 mm glass slide. Hughes et al. examined a larg

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Viral discovery gives new hope for schizophrenia sufferers

By | April 11, 2001

Retroviral genes inserted into the human genome may contribute to some cases of schizophrenia.

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