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Systematic proteomics in yeast

By | January 10, 2002

Large-scale purification and mass spectrometry has been used to characterize hundreds of multiprotein complexes in yeast.

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Numerous genetic and environmental factors are thought to be responsible for the development of atherosclerosis, but the role of pathogens in this process remains unclear. In January 1 Circulation, Christine Espinola-Klein and colleagues at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany, demonstrated a strong association between viral and bacterial pathologic burden and the extent of atherosclerosis (Circulation 2002, 105:15-21).Espinola-Klein et al. analyzed the presence and extent of periphe

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Deoxygenated ballast water restores balance

By | January 9, 2002

The discharge of ballast water collected from one region into the ecosystem of another has long been recognized as a major environmental problem. In January Biological Conservation, Mario Tamburri and colleagues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute show that deoxygenating ballast water can prevent the introduction of exotic invasive species and also reduce ship corrosion (Biological Conservation 2002, 103:331-341).Investigations by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., showed that ballast w

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SMaRT correction

By | January 9, 2002

Gene therapists have developed a RNA-mediated technique for correcting gene defects that cause cystic fibrosis.

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Better intelligence for the battle of the bulge

By | January 8, 2002

Identification of the factor that stimulates fat cell development could help fight obesity and diabetes.

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Deadly termite trap

By | January 8, 2002

A carnivorous pitcher plant uses a fringe of edible white hairs to lure and trap termites in large numbers.

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GM pigs could fill transplant gap

By | January 8, 2002

Genetically modified pigs could provide organs for transplant that are not rejected by the immune system.

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Variation on the fourth

By | January 8, 2002

The fourth chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster was believed to be free from variation and meiotic recombination, leading to several theories about its selection and evolution. In the January 4 Science, Wen Wang and researchers at the University of Chicago challenge these theories with their discovery of regions of variation along the chromosome (Science 2002, 295:134-137).They analysed nucleotide sequence around the toy gene locus from many fly collections worldwide. The observation that there

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Damage in worms

By | January 7, 2002

Combined functional genomics approaches help to identify novel genes involved in the DNA damage response pathway in nematodes.

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p53 controls ageing

By | January 7, 2002

The p53 protein works to suppress cancer cells by the induction of senescence, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but its role in the longevity of organisms remains unknown. In 3 January Nature, Stuart Tyner and colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA, show that p53 has a role in controlling ageing in mice.Tyner et al. generated mice with a mutation that confers phenotypes consistent with activated p53. They found that mutated mice are highly resistant to tumors but display early

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