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The origin of HIV-1

By | April 26, 2001

Three independent studies quash the theory that experimental polio vaccines administered in Central Africa in the 1950s were the origin of the AIDS pandemic.

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Disruption in oligodendrocyte function indicated in schizophrenia

By | April 25, 2001

Myelin sheaths are critical for efficient signal transmission along axons. Their inactivation could explain some of the neuropathological deficits associated with schizophrenia.In the April 10 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Yaron Hakak and colleagues of the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, San Diego, California used DNA microarray analysis to compare the gene-activation profiles in the postmortem dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of 12 schizophrenic and 12 no

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Interleukin-2 receptor can predict cancer outcome

By | April 25, 2001

High serum concentrations of the alpha chain IL-2 receptor are highly correlated with a shorter survival of patients diagnosed with head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma.

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New protease inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease

By | April 24, 2001

protein but did not affect the endoproteolysis of presenilins involved in cell defence.

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Regeneration of damaged axons

By | April 24, 2001

Sites of injury to the central nervous system can be treated with chondroitinase ABC to clear the path for axon regeneration.

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Rhythm disorder alleles

By | April 24, 2001

The genes that regulate circadian rhythms have been genetically characterized in flies and mice. In the April issue of EMBO Reports, Ebisawa et al. describe a screen for genetic polymorphisms associated with human circadian rhythm disorders (EMBO Reports 2001, 2:342-346). They performed a PCR-based analysis of the human period3 gene (hPer3), a homolog of a Drosophila clock gene, and identified 20 sequence variations, of which six predicted amino acid changes. Ebisawa et al. defined four haplotyp

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same difference

By | April 23, 2001

Honeybees are capable of cognitive performances thought to occur only in vertebrates.

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Sweet success

By | April 23, 2001

now a candidate receptor gene has been identified.

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What happens when nerve cells lose their way?

By | April 23, 2001

encodes a molecule that helps guide axons from the eye to the brain.

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Antisense oligonucleotide treatment for human astrocytoma

By | April 20, 2001

Active antisense oligonucleotides directed against the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-IR/AS ODN) have shown potential as an antitumour agent in animal studies. In April Journal of Clinical Oncology David Andrews and colleagues from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, describe their novel implantation of IGF-IR/AS ODN treated cells in patients with astrocytoma.Andrews et al studied 12 patients treated by surgery for malignant astrocytoma. Glioma cells collected at

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