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Cow clones

By | May 29, 2002

X-chromosome inactivation, the largest epigenetic event known, involves random silencing of one of the two X chromosomes in the cells of female mammals. In an Advanced Early Publication in Nature Genetics, Fei Xue and colleagues report defects in X inactivation in cells from cloned bovine embryos (NatGenet 2002, DOI:10.1038/ng900).Xue etal. looked at the allele-specific expression of the X-linked monoamine oxidase type A (MAOA) gene and at the expression of Xist and other X-linked genes in clone

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Smallpox repays the complement

By | May 29, 2002

The variola virus overcomes human viral clearance by inactivation of complement components C3b and C4b.

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Comparing Xanthomonas

May 28, 2002

Comparison of the sequence of two phytopathogen genomes reveals insights into the molecular basis for host specificity and pathogenicity.

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Genes contributing to heart attack identified

By | May 28, 2002

Loci on chromosomes two, three and 20 are implicated in susceptibility to myocardial infarction.

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MS enzyme discovery points to novel treatment

By | May 28, 2002

Elevated levels of enzyme myelencephalon-specific protease in MS lesions could represent drug target.

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RAGE against arthritis

By | May 28, 2002

RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end-products) and its proinflammatory ligands are commonly identified in the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but their role in the disease has been unclear. In May Genes and Immunity, Hofmann and colleagues from Columbia University, New York, show that a polymorphism in the RAGE gene within the ligand-binding domain of the receptor (RAGE 82S) may contribute to enhanced proinflammatory mechanisms in immune/inflammatory diseases (Genes Immun

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'Power naps' in job description?

By | May 27, 2002

A short daytime nap may contribute to the consolidation of learning and improve performance in visual discrimination tasks.

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Oncogenic phosphatase amplification

By | May 27, 2002

Post-translational regulation of p53 regulates its activity and tumor suppressor functions. In an Advanced Online Publication in Nature Genetics, Dmitry Bulavin and colleagues from the National Institutes of Health describe how oncogenic Ras regulates p53 phosphorylation (Nat Genet 2002, DOI:10.1038/ng894).Bulavin et al. used antibodies specific for different modified forms of p53 and showed that oncogenic Ras induced p53, accumulation and phosphorylation of two specific serine residues that are

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Potential for muscle regeneration

By | May 27, 2002

A novel population of muscle stem cells from mice could hold the key to the treatment of muscle-wasting diseases.

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Haplotype blocks

By | May 24, 2002

Advances in medicine will undoubtedly be linked to our ability to correlate human genetic variation with disease. In the 23 May ScienceXpress, Stacey Gabriel and colleagues report a large-scale analysis of haplotypes in the human genome (Sciencexpress 2002, DOI:10.1126/science.1069424).Gabriel et al. characterized haplotype patterns for 51 genomic regions with an average size of 250 kb (covering 13 megabases) from African, European and Asian DNA samples. They genotyped thousands of single nucleo

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