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Two populations of memory T cells

By | March 5, 2001

T cells injected into mice suggests that there are two discrete populations of memory T cells.

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A marker for asymptomatic glaucoma

By | March 2, 2001

Endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 is consistently present on the trabecular meshwork cells in the outflow pathways of eyes with glaucomas of diverse etiology.

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Delivering drugs via the brain

By | March 2, 2001

brain barrier.

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Plants cope better without telomerase

By | March 2, 2001

Mice lacking telomerase exhibit reduced fertility and severe developmental defects after a few generations. In the March 2 Science, Riha et al. report the effects of telomere shortening in Arabidopsis thaliana (Science 2001, 291:1797-1800). Homozygous telomerase-deficient plants displayed progressive telomere shortening (250-500 base pairs per generation). Defects in vegetative organs and reproductive systems did not appear before the sixth generation (reduced leaf size and symmetry), however. T

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A possible blood test for prion infection

By | March 1, 2001

A significant decrease in erythroid differentiation-related factor (EDRF) RNA can be detected in the blood of animals infected with a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy.

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Anaphylactic shock from a self-peptide

By | March 1, 2001

Anaphylactic shock is normally triggered by foreign antigens but a self-antigen can trigger it in a mouse model, presumably because the antigen is not expressed in the thymus.

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more than just a problem with chloride ions

By | March 1, 2001

ion transport in cystic fibrosis has important implications for treatment of this debilitating condition.

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Early breast cancer detection

By | February 28, 2001

Early detection is critical for the clinical management of breast cancer. In the February 27 Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Martin et al. describe a highly sensitive blood-based assay to detect and classify solid tumours (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:2646-2651). The high-throughput assay involves a two-step approach, combining differential display with cDNA microarrays. Martin et al. analysed blood samples from 26 breast cancer patients for the expression of 12 breast can

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Preference for one's own kind?

By | February 28, 2001

Genetic studies show that eels from different parts of the world don't mate in a free-for-all once they reach the Sargasso Sea.

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Gene for DiGeorge syndrome

By | February 27, 2001

DiGeorge syndrome (DGS; also known as Velo-cardio-facial syndrome) is associated with hemizygous deletion of a region of human chromosome 22q11, causing a range of abnormalities including cardiovascular defects, hypoplasia of the thymus and parathyroid gland, and craniofacial abnormalities.Three research groups have identified the TBX1 gene, a member of the T-box family of transcription factors, as a key determinant of the DGS phenotype. Merscher et al. (Cell 2001, 104:619-629) and Lindsay et al

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