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Neuroglobin protection in brain ischaemia

By | December 17, 2001

Ischaemic injury can prompt increased neuroglobin production and a reduction in hypoxia.

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Rewiring the brain

By | December 17, 2001

Injuries of eye lenses can induce significant axonal regeneration of the optic nerve.

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Double mutations

By | December 14, 2001

The vast majority of genes in the yeast genome are non-essential suggesting significant functional redundancy. In the December 14 Science, Amy Tong and colleagues describe an approach for high-throughput synthetic-lethal analysis in yeast (Science 2001, 294:2364-2368).They developed an ordered array of about 4,700 viable gene-deletion mutants and generated haploid double-mutants; they called this strategy synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis. Tong et al. tested a query strain with a deletion i

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In control of body size

By | December 14, 2001

The proto-oncogene c-Myc has been implicated in the genesis of many different types of tumors, but its role in normal physiology remains unclear. In December 13 Nature, Andreas Trumpp and colleagues from University of California at San Francisco show that in mammals c-Myc controls the decision to divide or not to divide and thereby functions as a crucial mediator of signals that determine organ and body size.Trumpp et al. generated an allelic series of mice in which c-Myc expression was incremen

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Wellcome Trust buys Crick's archives

By | December 14, 2001

The Wellcome Trust and Heritage Lottery Fund combine to secure open access to Francis Crick's papers.

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Mast cell survival gene

By | December 13, 2001

RI-induced mast cell survival, but has no obvious role in mast cell development.

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Telomere capping

By | December 13, 2001

Telomeres protect the ends of chromosomes and prevent chromosomal end-to-end fusions. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) has been implicated in DNA repair and telomere maintenance. In the December 18 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, David Gilley and colleagues at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report the use of knockout mice to examine the function of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:15084-15088).Analysis of fibroblast and primary cu

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Bugs in flies

By | December 12, 2001

The mechanisms underlying the innate immune system are highly conserved from flies to mammals. In the December 18 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Phil Irving and colleagues describe a genome-wide screen for genes induced in Drosophila following infection with bacteria or fungi (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:15119-15124).They performed oligonucleotide-array gene-profiling analysis on material from flies inoculated with Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria or with the fungi B

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T-cell loss in HIV explained

By | December 12, 2001

not a decrease in T cell production.

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Defective axonal transport in Alzheimer's disease

By | December 11, 2001

The normal function of amyloid precursor protein, involved in Alzheimer's disease, is to transport cellular materials along the axons.

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