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Anthrax genomics

By | May 9, 2002

The threat of bioterrorism has renewed interest in techniques for pathogen detection, monitoring and analysis. In the May 8 ScienceXpress, Timothy Read and researchers at The Institute for Genome Research (TIGR) Maryland, USA, describe a genome-based analysis of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax (DOI:10.1126/science.1071837).Read et al. assembled sequences from a recent isolate of B. anthracis used in a series of fatal letter-based attacks in Florida that followed in the wake of

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Smallpox debate flares again

By | May 9, 2002

World Health Assembly to decide whether to keep or destroy deadly virus.

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Streptomyces coelicolor genome

By | May 9, 2002

genome reveals many of the adaptations necessary for life in the highly competitive soil environment.

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Annotation by SAGE

By | May 8, 2002

The inventors of SAGE technology describe a modified method to facilitate gene discovery.

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The weak point of PEO

By | May 8, 2002

causes error-prone DNA synthesis in progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

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Display of targets in multiple sclerosis

By | May 7, 2002

Gene-microarray analysis of multiple sclerosis lesions reveals molecular mechanisms and new therapeutic targets.

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Insulin galore

By | May 7, 2002

Type I diabetes is caused by the destruction of insulin secreting cells and consequently treatments focus on either replacing or regenerating insulin production. In May Diabetes, Hideto Kojima and colleagues from Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan show that combined expression of pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx-1) and islet factor 1 (Isl-1) can cause immature intestinal stem cells to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (Diabetes 2002, 51:1398-1408).Kojima et al. observed that

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Splicing chips

By | May 7, 2002

The process of RNA splicing by the spliceosome helps to generate molecular diversity beyond the genome sequence. In the May 3 Science, Tyson Clark and colleagues at the University of California, Santa Cruz describe a genome-wide study of splicing in yeast (Science 2002, 296:907-910).Clark et al. designed custom microarrays with oligonucleotides capable of distinguishing between spliced and unspliced RNAs, and demonstrated the specificity of this splicing-specific microarray by analysing RNA from

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The hidden transcriptome

By | May 7, 2002

Analysis of the human transcriptome is often limited to annotated sequences. In the May 3 Science, Philipp Kapranov and colleagues at Affymetrix Inc., California provide evidence for many undiscovered transcribed sequences from human chromosomes 21 and 22 (Science 2002, 296:916-919).Most microarray transcriptome analysis is based on annotated exon sequences. Kapranov et al. took an empirical approach and constructed microarrays containing 25-mer oligonucleotides spaced uniformly every 35 base-pa

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Astrocytes teach stem cells to become neurons

By | May 3, 2002

Astrocytes make up nearly half of the total number of brain cells, providing structural, metabolic and tropic support for neurons, but they were considered to play no active part in stem cell differentiation. In May 2 Nature, Hongjun Song and colleagues from The Salk Institute, La Jolla, California, show for the first time that adult astrocytes can induce neurogenesis by instructing the stem cells to adopt a neuronal fate (Nature 2002, 417:39-44).Song et al. used cell culture systems and investi

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