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BSE origins remain obscure, but the epidemic is clearer

By | August 10, 2001

The long awaited Horn report on the BSE epidemic throws up as many questions as it answers.

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Space adds new dimension to cancer research

By | August 10, 2001

Culturing cells in the reduced gravity conditions of the International Space Station could help refine cancer treatment regimes.

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Sporozoite transcriptome

By | August 9, 2001

The protozoan parasite Plasmodium causes malaria, the most serious parasitic disease in humans. The identification of proteins expressed at the infectious sporozoite stage is important for the selection of potential vaccine candidates. In the August 14 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Stefan Kappe and colleagues from the New York University School of Medicine describe attempts to characterize the sporozoite transcriptome (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:9895-9900).They construct

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Structure of a DNA damage repair protein

By | August 9, 2001

The Ku heterodimer forms a cradle in which broken DNA strands rest whilst being repaired.

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Human cloning debate in the US rages on

By | August 8, 2001

Ahead of an upcoming Senate vote on human cloning, the announcement by an Italian embryologist of his plans to clone a human has further polarised the debate in the US.

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Lipocalin killer

By | August 8, 2001

In the August 3 Science, Laxminarayana Devireddy and colleagues from the University of Massachusetts Medical School report the use of DNA microarrays to identify genes whose expresssion is induced during apoptosis (Science 2001, 293:829-834). They studied cell death of a mouse pro-B lymphocytic cell line upon withdrawl of interleukin-3. The gene that showed the largest induction (12.6-fold) was 24p3, which encodes a lipocalin. Lipocalins are small secreted proteins, and Devireddy et al. found th

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Ink and Arf

By | August 7, 2001

When primary murine fibroblasts are placed in culture they exhibit replicative senescence, associated with the induction of cell-cycle inhibitors. The Ink4a-Arf locus encodes two proteins, p16Ink4a and p19Arf, which regulate the cell cycle by modulating the activities of pRb and p53, respectively. In the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Randle et al. describe the role of p19Arf in preventing immortalization of bone-marrow-derived preB cells and macrophages (P

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Sand fly saliva spits out Leishmania vaccine

By | August 7, 2001

A DNA vaccine derived from a sand fly saliva protein could protect against vector borne parasitic diseases.

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Two-hybrid assay in plants

By | August 7, 2001

protein-fragment complementation assay can monitor protein-protein interactions in living plant cells.

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Myotonic expansion

By | August 6, 2001

Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy. DM Type 1 caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase (DMPK) gene. In the August 3 Science, Christina Liquori and colleagues from the University of Minnesota report that DM2 is also caused by microsatellite expansion in non-coding sequences (Science 2001, 293:864-867). While characterizing the DM2 locus on chromosome 13q21, Liquori et al. discovered an exp

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