Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Are SNPs useful?

By | April 5, 2001

In the April Nature Genetics, Marth et al. ask the question how useful are the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) available in the public-access databases (Nature Genetics 2001, 27:371-372). The public database dbSNP currently holds over 2.8 million SNPs, but as few as 15% have been proven to be genuinely polymorphic. Marth et al. performed two pilot studies to test the genetic utility of candidate SNPs. They analysed over 1200 candidate SNPs and tested their frequency in three ethnic groups

0 Comments

Thymus: the source of latent HIV

By | April 5, 2001

Successful antiretroviral therapy results in a substantial reduction in viraemia but cannot eradicate HIV. The virus remains latent in a subset of cells where it avoids elimination by the immune system. In the April Nature Medicine, David Brooks and colleagues from the University of California at Los Angeles suggest that the thymus may be the source of latently infected cells, as latent HIV infection can occur during thymopoiesis.They studied SCID-hu (Thy/Liv) mice, in which human thymic implant

0 Comments

A new mechanism of thymic selection

By | April 4, 2001

The thymus prevents autoimmunity by inducing apoptosis of the T cells that express autoreactive receptors to self peptides. But this mechanism alone is insufficient and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are selected in the thymus to control autoreactive thymic escapees. In the April Nature Immunology, researchers from The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, describe a novel mechanism of thymic selection that is involved in the generation of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.Using a murine model, Jordan et al

0 Comments

Adapting to the cold

By | April 4, 2001

Plants have evolved a number of cold-response genes encoding proteins that induce tolerance to freezing, alter water absorption and initiate many other low temperature induced processes. In the 1 April Genes and Development, Jian-Kang Zhu and colleagues of the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, shed light on how these genes are regulated.Lee et al report that the protein HOS1 negatively regulates cold-response genes in Arabidopsis. At low temperatures, HOS1 relocalises from the

0 Comments

As AIDS drug prices plummet for Third World, questions still abound

By | April 3, 2001

lites benefit? And what about drug resistance?

0 Comments

Bloom-in' flies

By | April 3, 2001

Bloom syndrome is a disease characterized by increased tumorigenesis, immunodeficiency and partial sterility. It is caused by mutations in the BLM gene, which encodes a helicase. In the March 30th Science, Kusano et al. describe characterization of the Drosophila Dmblm homolog of BLM (Science 2001, 291:2600-2602). They show that Dmblm corresponds to mus309, which was originally identified in a mutagen-sensitivity screen. Disrupting the Dmblm gene causes mutagen sensitivity and female sterility,

0 Comments

Fear: real and imagined

By | April 3, 2001

might be able to differentiate between real and imagined fear.

0 Comments

The role of complement in spongiform encephalopathies

By | April 3, 2001

Depletion of complement factors or the complement receptor significantly delays the onset of scrapies in a mouse model.

0 Comments

A caspase-independent apoptosis pathway

By | April 2, 2001

The first wave of programmed cell death in the early mouse embryo requires apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and not caspases.

0 Comments

Benefits of mutation

By | April 2, 2001

Natural pathogenic bacteria populations can harbour mutator alleles (with high mutation rates) that may offer a selection advantage. In the March 30 Science, Giraud et al. describe a model to investigate the role of mutator alleles in influencing adaptation to complex environments in vivo (Science 2001, 291:2606-2608). They examined the colonization of the mouse gut by Escherichia coli strains with a high mutation rate due to a defective MutS protein. By examining bacteria in fecal samples they

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist