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Dynamic auxin efflux carriers

By | October 2, 2001

The transport of the hormone auxin through plant cells may be a more dynamic process than previously thought.

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Telomerase mutations

By | October 2, 2001

Patients with dyskeratosis congenita suffer from defects in skin, nails, hair and gut, and usually die from bone-marrow failure. An X-linked form of the disease is due to mutations in the DKC1 gene that encodes dyskerin, a protein associated with small nucleolar RNAs and telomerase RNA (hTR). In the September 27 Nature, Tom Vulliamy and researchers at Imperial College and the Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, identify mutations that cause autosomal dominant dyskeratosis congenita (Nature 2001, 4

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Germ warfare

By | October 1, 2001

The attack on the World Trade Center has increased speculation that populations could be at risk from terrorist attacks with biological and chemical weapons.

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Muscle profiles

By | October 1, 2001

Different skeletal myofibre types are known to express distinct muscle myosin isoforms. In the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Porter et al., from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, USA, describe a genomics approach to exploring the molecular signatures underlying skeletal muscle biology (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 10.1073/pnas.211257298).They used high-density oligonucleotide arrays (from Affymetrix) to measure gene expression profiles in the ext

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Organ development signals from the vasculature

By | October 1, 2001

Blood vessels are an essential, but largely passive infrastructure for organ development, supplying metabolic provisions to the dividing cells. But, in September 28 on line Science, Eckhard Lammert and colleagues from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard University, show that during pancreatic organogenesis blood vessels not only provide metabolic provisions but also offer inductive signals for organ development.Lammert et al. performed cell culture experiments with embryonic mouse tissue an

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Cells whisper

By | September 28, 2001

Cells respond within a millisecond to changes in membrane voltage, emitting sounds whilst they fulfil their function.

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Intronic sequences

By | September 28, 2001

We are far from understanding all the rules that govern the process of RNA splicing and defining the sequence information that governs intron definition. In the September 25 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Lee Lim and Christopher Burge at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA, describe a computational approach for investigating intron splicing (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:11193-11198).They chose transcripts from five eukaryote genomes (Saccharomyces cerev

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Chemical behind exercise 'lift' discovered

By | September 27, 2001

The mystery over the antidepressant effects of physical activity may have finally been solved.

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Negative regulator of B cell function

By | September 27, 2001

A newly identified Btk-interacting protein, IBtk, binds to the PH domain of Btk and downregulates Btk function in B cells.

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Study points to new genetic model for disease

By | September 27, 2001

Biedel syndrome, a classically Mendelian genetic disease is triallelic.

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