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Too much oxygen kills stem cells

By | November 13, 2001

Oxygen levels used in standard cell culture apparatus could slow growth and trigger an alternate developmental pathway.

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Barcode screening

By | November 12, 2001

An international project is replacing each yeast open reading frame (ORF) with a drug-resistance cassette containing two 20-mer oligonucleotide 'barcodes' that can be used as hybridization tags for each gene. In the November 8 Sciencexpress, Siew Loon Ooi and colleagues describe the use of this resource to screen for mutants defective in nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (10.1126/science.1065672).They used a transformation-based plasmid-repair assay to screen for NHEJ activity. They prepared hapl

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Neurons need cholesterol to establish contacts

By | November 12, 2001

Cholesterol secreted by glial cells in complex with apolipoprotein E promotes neuronal synapse development.

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Global fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria

By | November 9, 2001

An international conference calls for substantially increased funding to undertake basic research and start to fight the scourge of AIDS in the developing world.

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NSAIDs tackle Alzheimer's disease

By | November 9, 2001

A subset of NSAIDs have a direct action on the mechanism of amyloid plaque production in the brain independently of COX activity.

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The anorexic hormone

By | November 9, 2001

Oleylethanolamide (OEA) is a natural analogue of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide that is suspected to have a role in cellular signaling. But, in 8 November Nature, F. Rodriguez de Fonseca and colleagues from Complutense University, Madrid, Spain and University of California at Irvine, US show that the main role of OEA is as a significant lipid mediator in the peripheral regulation of feeding.Using rats Rodriguez de Fonseca et al. found that food deprivation markedly reduced OEA biosynthesi

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What is the normal range for gene expression?

By | November 9, 2001

The mouse is being widely used as a model organism in microarray studies, yet little is known about the range of normal physiological variance in gene expression in complex systems in vivo. In the November 6 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Colin Pritchard and colleagues at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre describe a study of normal variation of gene expression levels in mouse tissues (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:13266-13271).They analysed the expression of over fiv

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Placental profiling

By | November 8, 2001

The extraembryonic lineage is the first to differentiate in mammals following fertilization. In the November 6 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Myriam Hemberger and colleagues at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Calgary, report the use of cDNA subtraction and microarray hybridisation to screen for genes implicated in placentogenesis (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:13126-13131).They isolated the ectoplacental cone region of mouse conceptuses at

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Liver damage receptor

By | November 7, 2001

Discoidin domain tyrosine kinase receptor 2 is induced in stellate cells during liver injury and perpetuates hepatic damage.

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PTEN profiling

By | November 7, 2001

Microarray analysis using an inducible expression system identifies genes regulated by the PTEN tumour suppressor.

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