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Rhythm disorder alleles

By | April 24, 2001

The genes that regulate circadian rhythms have been genetically characterized in flies and mice. In the April issue of EMBO Reports, Ebisawa et al. describe a screen for genetic polymorphisms associated with human circadian rhythm disorders (EMBO Reports 2001, 2:342-346). They performed a PCR-based analysis of the human period3 gene (hPer3), a homolog of a Drosophila clock gene, and identified 20 sequence variations, of which six predicted amino acid changes. Ebisawa et al. defined four haplotyp

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same difference

By | April 23, 2001

Honeybees are capable of cognitive performances thought to occur only in vertebrates.

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Sweet success

By | April 23, 2001

now a candidate receptor gene has been identified.

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What happens when nerve cells lose their way?

By | April 23, 2001

encodes a molecule that helps guide axons from the eye to the brain.

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Antisense oligonucleotide treatment for human astrocytoma

By | April 20, 2001

Active antisense oligonucleotides directed against the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-IR/AS ODN) have shown potential as an antitumour agent in animal studies. In April Journal of Clinical Oncology David Andrews and colleagues from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, describe their novel implantation of IGF-IR/AS ODN treated cells in patients with astrocytoma.Andrews et al studied 12 patients treated by surgery for malignant astrocytoma. Glioma cells collected at

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Bacteria rapidly develop resistance to new antibiotic

By | April 20, 2001

can quickly become resistant to linezolid during extended treatment.

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genome

By | April 20, 2001

contains genes acquired from a variety of organisms that are implicated in the development of antibiotic resistance.

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Mitochondrial DNA insertions

By | April 20, 2001

There is evidence for substantial transfer of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to the nuclear genome in plants. Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence indicated a mtDNA insertion of 270 kilobases (kb), larger than previously described mitochondria-to-nuclear DNA insertions. In the April 24 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Stupar et al present a detailed cytological characterization of the mtDNA insertion in chromosome 2 of A. thaliana (Proc Natl Acad Sci

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Snapshots of a cellular motor

By | April 20, 2001

The enzyme ATP synthase spins like a wheel to convert energy into ATP for storage. High-speed imaging reveals the details of the rotation.

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Adrenergic signalling affects progression of cardiomyopathy

By | April 19, 2001

-adrenergic receptor signalling or excitation-contraction coupling can prevent systolic dysfunction, exercise intolerance and cardiac remodelling.

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