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genome

By | December 5, 2001

Some transposable elements can be beneficial and others may persist in the genomes of sexually reproducing eukaryotes even if they are deleterious. In the December 4 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Irina Arkhipova and Hilary Morrison report the characterization of retrotransposons in the Giardia lamblia genome (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:14497-14502).G. lamblia is a protozoan parasite, one of the earliest-branching eukaryotes, and is thought to be asexual. Arkhipova and Mor

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the fight continues

By | December 5, 2001

Despite a lower media profile HIV/AIDS looks set to become the biggest and most far-reaching pandemic in human history.

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The MLL leukemia

By | December 5, 2001

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL) translocations has a particularly poor prognosis, but it is not clear if host-related factors or tumor-intrinsic biological differences are responsible for these poor survival rates. In December 3 on line Nature Genetics, Scott Armstrong and colleagues from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, show that acute leukemia with MLL translocations has a gene expression profile that identifies them as a unique, new type

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Genes repressed by GDNF

By | December 4, 2001

The genes down-regulated by the glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor may account for the factor's inhibition of neurite growth.

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Global health and bioterror meeting

By | December 4, 2001

Increased research spending on the agents of bioterrorism could have huge spin offs for the developing world.

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HIV entry and membrane lipid rafts

By | December 4, 2001

Cholesterol lowering drugs could be used to disrupt the cell entry mechanism of many intracellular pathogens.

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Pro-apoptotic influenza protein

By | December 4, 2001

Severe influenza infections can kill, particularly neonates and the elderly, but despite this little is known about the viral proteins involved in pathogenicity. In December Nature Medicine, Weisan Chen and colleagues from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, US, describe a novel influenza A virus mitochondrial protein that induces cell death in host immune cells sent to destroy the influenza virus.Chen et al. searched for alternative peptides encoded by influenza

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New lipid-lowering drugs

By | December 3, 2001

Drugs such as statins can reduce high plasma levels of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol that is a significant risk factor for atherosclerosis. In December Nature Medicine Thierry Grand-Perret and colleagues from GlaxoSmithKline, France showed that compounds that bind directly to the sterol regulating protein SCAP, could lower cholesterol levels via a mechanism other than that employed by the statins.Grand-Perret et al. administered SCAP ligands to hyperlipidemic hamsters and found t

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The missing link

By | December 3, 2001

The increasing prevalence of asthma in industrialized societies may be a consequence of improved hygiene levels and a reduction in the incidence in infections such as tuberculosis and hepatitis A. But, the molecular mechanisms that would help to explain these theories remain elusive. In November 28 Nature Immunology Jennifer McIntire and colleagues from Stanford University, Stanford, US show that Tim1 gene on chromosome 5q may explain the inverse relationship between hepatitis A virus (HAV) infe

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Wood genomics

By | December 3, 2001

Transcript profiling identifies groups of genes associated with different developmental stages during the formation of wood in trees.

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