Advertisement

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Modest alcohol consumption attenuates stroke risk in young women

By | January 12, 2001

Young women who drink one or two units of alcohol a day are less likely to suffer an ischemic stroke than teetotallers or heavier drinkers

0 Comments

Simvastatin may act on blood pressure regulation directly

By | January 12, 2001

Statins may directly affect blood pressure regulation, independently of their lipid-lowering properties.

0 Comments

The first transgenic primate

By | January 12, 2001

A transgenic primate has been successfully created for the first time - the rhesus macaque carries the GFP gene but doesn't glow in the dark.

0 Comments

Food for thought

By | January 11, 2001

The molecule ghrelin is an acylated peptide that stimulates the release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland. Masamitsu Nakazato and collegues from Miyazaki Medical College, Kiyotake, Japan report in 11 January Nature that ghrelin mediates feeding and probably has a function in growth regulation, by stimulating feeding and release of growth hormone.Nakazato et al injected ghrelin into the brains of rats, and found that the animals ate more and gained weight (Nature 2001, 409:194-198). Con

0 Comments

How aspirin protects you from cancer

By | January 11, 2001

Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs reduce the risk of cancer by inducing apoptotic cell death. How this occurs, however, is unknown. A critical pathway for apoptosis involves the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. This interacts with Apaf-1 to activate caspase proteases that orchestrate cell death. Douglas R. Green from La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology, San Diego, and colleagues, found that treatment of a human cancer cell line with aspirin induced casp

0 Comments

The sticking place

By | January 11, 2001

Platelets are central to the process of wound healing. But overly responsive platelets could block normal blood flow, particularly where atherosclerosis exists, resulting in stroke, myocardial infarction and unstable angina. Hence the interest in studying the receptors for platelet-activating substances released from damaged vessels, like ADP.In 11 January Nature, Pamela B. Conley of COR Therapeutics, California, and colleagues report that they have cloned the ADP receptor P2Y12 and showed that

0 Comments

FANCY metabolomics

By | January 10, 2001

In the January Nature Biotechnology, Raamsdonk et al. find that, even when mutation of a gene causes no obvious phenotype, metabolite profiling can still give clues to gene function (Nat Biotechnol 2001, 19:45-50). Their test case involves two yeast strains deleted for either one of the two redundant genes for 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (6-PF-2-K). These deletion strains fail to show a growth defect, even in chemostat competition experiments, but an analysis of specific metabolites clearly sets th

0 Comments

Evolution caught in the act

By | January 8, 2001

Duplication, deletion and mutation have created a new gene, denoted Sdic, that encodes a fly sperm axoneme protein. Sdic is present in the fly Drosophila melanogaster, but not in its close relative Drosophila simulans. In the 5 January Science, Nurminsky et al. find evidence for a selective sweep around Sdic in D. melanogaster (Science 2001, 291:128-130). D. melanogaster DNA has a significant depression in the level of synonymous polymorphism around Sdic, and an increase in the occurrence of rar

0 Comments

Loopy expression

By | January 8, 2001

Yeast is unusual in that its transcriptional activators cannot work over long distances. But in the 4 January Nature, de Bruin et al. report that the looping of heterochromatic-like telomere regions corrects this shortcoming (Nature 2001, 409:109-113). They place a binding site for the activator Gal4 downstream of a reporter gene. The site is inactive when the reporter is at an internal chromosomal locus, but active when the gene cassette is placed, in either orientation, near the telomere. Only

0 Comments

Shocking phosphorylation of histones

By | January 8, 2001

Histone modifications are required to gain access to DNA sequences within the tightly compacted genome and enable gene transcription. It has been proposed that acetylation of the amino-terminal tails of the core histones within the nucleosome particle is critical for activating transcription. In the December Genes and Development, Nowak and Corces suggest that histone phosphorylation may play a greater role than acetylation in gene induction (Genes Dev 2000, 14:3003-3013). They studied the he

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Cisbio
Cisbio
Advertisement