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Primitive microbe enlightens evolution

By | December 21, 2001

Single-celled choanoflagellates have a unique receptor tyrosine kinase that may be linked to the origin of multicellular animals.

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The ship of the desert's pharmaceutical cargo

By | December 21, 2001

The smaller antibodies of the camel could help fight human viral diseases and cancer.

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Three-spined sticklebacks

By | December 21, 2001

The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteusaculeatus) is a teleost fish that has undergone rapid adaptive evolution and speciation within the last 15,000 years. The benthic species has greatly reduced body armour, increased body depth and fewer gill rakers than the limnetic species, which more closely resemble an ancestral marine fish. In the December 20/27 Nature, Peichel et al. report the generation of a genome-wide linkage map for G. aculeatus (Nature 2001, 414:901-905).They collected 1,176 cl

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Wishing you a myrhhy Christmas

By | December 21, 2001

The Three Wise Men may have delivered a gift that just keeps on giving.

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Death domains, dysplasia and development

By | December 20, 2001

locus encodes a death-domain adaptor protein associated with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

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for now

By | December 20, 2001

Suggestions that ultrasound could damage male fetuses has led to calls for continuous assessment of the technique.

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Genetic modification of mouse embryonic stem cells

By | December 20, 2001

Mitotic recombination can be reproducibly induced in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells using the Cre/loxP rare-cutter restriction enzymes.

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Molecular effects of the fat hormone

By | December 20, 2001

Adipose-derived protein Acrp30 is a recently identified hormone released from fat tissue that has a role in glucose metabolism, but its molecular effects remain elusive. In December 15 Journal of Clinical Investigation, Terry Combs and colleagues from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, show that a moderate rise in circulating levels of Acrp30 inhibits both the expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes and the rate of endogenous glucose production. Combs et al. studied the ef

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UK autism review emphasizes importance of lay participation

By | December 20, 2001

Lay participation in medical research review illustrates the differing perceptions that scientists and the public have of each other.

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Genetic pathway to sudden death

By | December 19, 2001

KChIP2 (Kv Channel-Interacting Protein 2) is preferentially expressed in the adult heart and has a role in sustaining the normal rhythmic beating, but its role in cardiac pathology remains unclear. In December 14 Cell, Hai-Chien Kuo and colleagues from University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA, show that a defect in KChIP2 is sufficient to confer a marked genetic susceptibility to ventricular tachycardia that would ordinarily lead to sudden death in humans.Kuo et al. used KChIP2-/- mice

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