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Protein polymorphisms

By | April 4, 2002

In an Advanced Online Publication from Nature Genetics, Klose at al. describe a comprehensive genetic study of proteins in the murine brain (Nat Genet 2002, DOI:10.1038/ng861).They took advantage of crosses from the European collaborative interspecific backcross (EUCIB) project, and prepared brain tissues from 200 backcross progeny (B1) animals. Klose at al. then analyzed the brain proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comparison of over 8000 gel spots from two distantly related mo

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Publication with a pinch of privatisation

By | April 4, 2002

yet again bends the rules in publishing the rice genome, opinions are strongly divided on whether this should be the shape of things to come.

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Ultrasound vision improved

By | April 4, 2002

A miniaturized, ultrasound transducer system can examine small areas of tissue and obtain sharp, well-defined images.

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Prostaglandin's colon repair receptor

By | April 3, 2002

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase the severity of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but little is known about the mechanisms by which prostanoid inhibition modulates IBD. In April 1 Journal of Clinical Investigation, Kenji Kabashima and colleagues from Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan, show that the prostaglandin receptor EP4 has a key role in mucosal protection, suppressing colitis, mucosal damage and CD4 cell activation in the gut.Kabashima et al. examined mice deficient in pro

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Serotonin vital for anxious adulthood

By | April 3, 2002

receptor acts during development to establish normal anxiety-like behavior in the adult.

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Strep genomics

By | April 3, 2002

Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infection by serotype M18 strains causes acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and can lead to pediatric heart disease. In the April 2 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, James Smoot and colleagues at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases report the genome sequence of a GAS strain (MGAS8232) isolated from a patient with ARF (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2002, 99:4668-4673).Smoot et al. compared the 1.9 Mb genome with a closely related strain (the M1 s

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Where do jaws come from?

By | April 3, 2002

The origin of the vertebrate jaw is something of a mystery. In the March 28 Nature, Martin Cohn from the University of Reading suggests that Hox gene expression may be at the origin of jaw evolution (Nature 2002, 416:386-387).In jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) the jaw and pharyngeal skeleton is derived from migrating cranial neural crest cells. Cohn studied the lamprey, a primitive jawless fish related to gnathostomes, in which the branchial arch is also neural-crest-derived. He cloned lamprey

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Linkage analysis in yeast

By | April 2, 2002

In a paper published on March 28 in Sciencexpress, Rachel Brem and colleagues describe how linkage analysis and gene expression profiling can be combined to dissect transcriptional regulatory networks in the budding yeast, Saccharomycescerevisiae (DOI:10.1126/science.1069516).Brem et al. crossed two yeast strains; a laboratory strain BY and a wild isolate RM from an Italian vineyard. Microarray analysis revealed 1528 genes expressed differentially between the two parent strains. They then used a

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Plant defense dissected

By | April 2, 2002

Calmodulin interacts with the protein MLO to control the defense mechanism against mildew in barley.

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Senescence tale

By | April 2, 2002

Replicative senescence is associated with telomere shortening and the loss from the ends of chromosomes of about 100 bp per population doubling. In March 19 Science, Jan Karlseder and colleagues at Rockefeller University claim that the state of the ends, rather than telomere loss, determines the induction of senescence (Science 2002, 295:2446-2449).Karlseder et al. studied primary human fibroblasts expressing TRF2, a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that binds to telomeric repeats. TRF2 ove

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