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New molecules that may yield a cure for stroke

By | March 7, 2001

In cerebral stroke an interruption of blood flow to the brain causes neuronal death. Several molecules have emerged in recent years as potentially protective for hypoxic neurons and may be of use in the treatment of stroke. In March Nature Medicine two groups report the identification of different proteins having these protective properties.Takao Sakai and colleagues from Lund University in Sweden studied plasma fibronectin-deficient adult mice using Cre-loxP conditional gene-knockout technology

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Uniparental disomy in ES cells

By | March 7, 2001

Homozygous mutant cells can be generated from embryonic stem (ES) cells with a single insertion of a drug-resistance marker by increasing the concentration of the selection drug. In the March Nature Genetics, Lefebvre et al. report analysis of the mechanism governing this loss of heterozygosity (LOH) (Nature Genetics 2001, 27:257-258). They used an ES cell line resulting from a cross between two different inbred mouse 129 substrains which could be distinguished by single sequence-length polymorp

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BAG-1 can predict survival from breast cancer

By | March 6, 2001

There is preliminary evidence that women with malignant breast tumours that contain high levels of the protein BAG-1 have a longer survival time.

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Chemokines may be used in metastasis

By | March 6, 2001

Chemokines and their receptors help guide tumour cells to their targets.

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Hyper-IgM syndrome dissected

By | March 6, 2001

B, can explain the hyper-IgM syndrome associated with ectodermal dysplasia.

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knockouts and Rett syndrome

By | March 6, 2001

Mice lacking the transcriptional repressor Mecp2 have symptoms resembling the neurological disorder Rett syndrome.

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Gene discovery by stringent annotation

By | March 5, 2001

In the March Nature Genetics, Gopal et al. describe a two-step approach to identify novel genes by combining stringent annotation with broad gene-prediction techniques (Nature Genetics 2001, 27:337-340). The first step involves identification of potential exons using the GENSCAN gene-finding program. In the second step, predicted genes are compared with all available gene and protein sequences, including expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from other organisms, at the protein level (in all six transl

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Role of the ATM protein in neurogenesis

By | March 5, 2001

Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a recessive childhood disease caused by mutations in the ATM (AT-mutated) gene. The hallmark of the disease is progressive neurodegeneration that eventually affects all areas of the brain. It is known that the ATM protein initiates a cascade of signalling events that leads to cell-cycle arrest and DNA repair in response to ionising radiation. Its role in the nervous system is not clear.In the 1 March Genes & Development, researchers led by Carrolee Barlow of the

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Two populations of memory T cells

By | March 5, 2001

T cells injected into mice suggests that there are two discrete populations of memory T cells.

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A marker for asymptomatic glaucoma

By | March 2, 2001

Endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 is consistently present on the trabecular meshwork cells in the outflow pathways of eyes with glaucomas of diverse etiology.

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