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Bee behavior

By | April 30, 2002

The insect foraging (for) gene encodes a cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) that affects foraging behavior. In Drosophila two different for alleles have been found, and the two alleles affect food-searching behavior under different ecological conditions. In the April 26 Science, Ben-Shahar et al. describe changes in for expression during bee development (Science 2002, 296:741-744).They studied the honeybee (Apis mellifera), which undergoes an age-related developmental switch from hive wor

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Grass genomics

By | April 30, 2002

Comparative genomics provides a powerful approach to identifying conserved non-coding sequences that regulate gene transcription. In the April 30 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Nicholas Kaplinsky and colleagues report the use of cross-species genomic DNA comparison to isolate conserved non-coding sequences in grass genomes (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2002, 99:6147-6151).Kaplinsky et al. compared the genomic sequences of rice and maize, two domesticated species in the Poaceae family

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T cells heal skin

By | April 30, 2002

Resident T cell receptor-bearing dendritic epidermal T cells have a role in speeding up wound repair.

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Neural cells from cord blood

By | April 29, 2002

Cord blood cells are easily available and preserved, and they could potentially serve as a routine starting material for isolation and expansion of cells for allogenic as well as authologous transplantations. But their potential to form human neural cells was unknown. In 15 May Journal of Cell Science, L. Buzanska and colleagues from Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, show for the first time that cells derived from human cord blood can achieve neuronal and glial features in vitro (J Cell Sci 20

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Plasmid may have led to bubonic plague

By | April 29, 2002

in the midgut of its principal vector, the rat flea

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Bargain-basement research

By | April 26, 2002

A hard-hitting new report says Britain has some of the best scientists in the world but not the research funding to match.

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From hair to eternity

By | April 26, 2002

Melanocyte stem cells exist in the lower permanent portion of hair follicles and are highly influenced by their niche.

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Schizophrenia surprise

By | April 26, 2002

There is some evidence that schizophrenia may have a genetic contribution, and susceptibility loci have been reported on chromosome 1q. In the April 26 Science Douglas Levinson and colleagues report their failure to confirm this genetic linkage in a larger sample (Science 2002, 296:739-741).They genotyped 16 microsatellite markers in 779 informative pedigrees containing almost a thousand affected sibling pairs, and an additional 1918 schizophrenic individuals. Statistical analysis of this large

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cancer link dismissed

By | April 25, 2002

There is no correlation between the risk of acoustic neuroma and mobile phone use.

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Genes for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy identified

By | April 25, 2002

gene may cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by disrupting expression of two cardiac contractile proteins.

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