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Hercerptin, shaken not stirred

By | March 26, 2002

Treating tumors with the monoclonal antibody herceptin can bypass drug resistance problems.

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Infectious mechanism in APS

By | March 26, 2002

2-glycoprotein-I may account for the infectious etiology of antiphospholipid syndrome.

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RNAi to RNAi

By | March 26, 2002

An RNA interference (RNAi) screen has been used to find genes involved in RNA interference.

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Early start for new tumor vessels

By | March 25, 2002

Small tumors need blood vessels for growth but it is not clear whether aggregates of malignant cells can induce vascularization or whether these cells grow by co-opting preexisting vessels. In March 15 Journal of Clinical Investigation Peter Vajkoczy and colleagues from University of Heidelberg, Germany, show that new vessels occur as a continuing process of growth and remodeling, starting very early in tumor progression (J Clin Invest 2002, 109:777-785).Vajkoczy et al. used intravital epifluore

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Heading south

By | March 25, 2002

A major conference in Egypt emphasizes the need to involve developing nations in biotechnology developments

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Potassium ions mediate bacterial destruction

By | March 25, 2002

The most important mechanism by which neutrophils inactivate bacteria was thought to be mediated by reactive oxygen species and myeloperoxidase-catalysed halogenation. But in March 21 Nature, Emer Reeves and colleagues from University College London show that the killing activity of neutrophils works through activation of proteases by potassium ions (Nature 2002, 416:291-297).Reeves et al. found that mice made deficient in neutrophil-granule proteases but with normal superoxide production and io

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$6 million autism gene hunt

By | March 21, 2002

A major initiative is launched to try and identify the genetic basis of autism.

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Collaboration key for xenotransplants

By | March 21, 2002

Non-rejecting pigs advance xenotransplantation but input from other fields is needed to optimize future progress.

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Ribozyme targeting

By | March 21, 2002

In the March 19 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Mohammed Kashani-Sabet and colleagues describe the use of plasmid-based ribozymes as functional genomics tools to unravel complex phenotypes, such as cancer metastasis (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2002, 99:3878-3883).Kashani-Sabet et al. reasoned that ribozyme-based gene targeting in mice might overcome experimental problems associated with transgenesis and lethal knockout phenotypes. They tested the use of systemic administration of ca

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Banking on British stem cell research

By | March 20, 2002

Will a US charity's decision to plough cash into Britain's stem cell bank pave the way for more transatlantic investment?

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