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Weapons lab to develop Celera's new supercomputer

By | January 25, 2001

that's what's in Craig Venter's mind. Sandia, the US nuclear weapons lab, will make the first step towards his dream, along with Celera and Compaq.

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Genetic link for psoriasis

By | January 24, 2001

Susceptibility loci at chromosomes 6p21 (PSORS1) and 1p have been identified for patients suffering from psoriasis.

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Taming horses

By | January 24, 2001

The importance of the domestication of horses to human civilisations is undisputed. But there are conflicting hypotheses about the origins of tamed horses; the 'restricted origin' hypothesis postulates selective breeding of a few founding lineages followed by distribution, while the 'multiple origins hypothesis' suggests independent recruitment of a large number of founders over an extended time period and geographical location. In the January 19 Science, Vila et al. describe genetic analysis t

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mainly because of the studies of one researcher. Susan Mayor assesses the evidence.

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Anticipation of epileptic seizures

By | January 23, 2001

Epileptic seizures may be predicted by analysing the non-linear changes in the patient's electroencephalogram.

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France acts on threat of BSE transmission by blood

By | January 23, 2001

The French blood transfusion authorities are banning donors who might have become exposed to BSE in the UK.

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Nerve regeneration no longer a Nogo area

By | January 23, 2001

Identification of a mechanism for blocking an inhibitor of axonal regrowth following injury could enable better recovery from CNS injury.

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Prothrombic effects of smoking may be directly due to nicotine

By | January 23, 2001

Smoking is associated with increased platelet-dependent thrombin generation, suggesting that smokers are in a chronic prothrombic state.

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Therapeutic cloning of human embryos to go ahead

By | January 23, 2001

Members of the UK's House of Lords voted last night in favour of allowing the cloning of human embryos for stem cell research.

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'I' is to the right

By | January 22, 2001

After damage or anaesthetisation of the right brain hemisphere, some people can suffer from misidentification of their own extremities (a condition known as asomatopagnosia). Researchers from Harvard Medical School believe they now have the data to explain why this happens.Julian Paul Keenan and colleagues studied patients who were having their brain hemispheres individually anaesthetised to investigate their epilepsy. During anaesthesia, the patients were shown pictures of faces generated by mo

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