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PRIMA facie evidence

By | March 6, 2002

The tumor suppressor p53 triggers cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis but about 50% of human tumors have mutations in p53 which makes them resistant to apoptosis. Vladimir Bykov and colleagues from Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden hypothesized that restoring p53 in tumor cells could trigger massive apoptosis and eliminate the tumor. In March Nature Medicine, they show that a small molecule, called PRIMA-1, can restore the tumor suppressor function of p53 and have anti-tumor effects.Bykov et

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Chipping away at GATA

By | March 5, 2002

-globin locus.

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Human stem cell research gets green light

By | March 5, 2002

The first UK licenses for human embryonic stem cell research have been granted.

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Nanny state seeks new manacles

By | March 5, 2002

UK researchers fear that legislation debated on Monday in the House of Lords could infringe academic freedom.

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Protease inhibitors kill tumors

By | March 5, 2002

Protease inhibitors are potent anti-angiogenic molecules with direct anti Kaposi sarcoma and anti-tumor activity.

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MAP kinase safeguards plants

By | March 4, 2002

MAP kinase signaling is involved in plant innate immunity, conferring resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogens.

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Shape of a chromodomain

By | March 4, 2002

The structure of the HP1 chromodomain shows how it recognizes methylated histone tails.

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Cloned mice are obese

By | March 1, 2002

Cloning using somatic cells has potentially important clinical and therapeutic applications, but the long-term effects of cloning on the offspring of these animals remains unknown. In March Nature Medicine, Kellie Tamashiro and colleagues from University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio, USA, show that cloned mice have an obese phenotype, but that this is not transmitted to their offspring.Tamashiro et al. examined cloned mice of different background strains (B6C3F1, B6D2F1) and used spec

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Good taste

By | March 1, 2002

The ability to taste gives animals a means to assess the identity and quality of potential food substances. In an Advanced Online Publication from Nature, Greg Nelson and colleagues at the University of California at San Diego describe characterization of the mammalian amino-acid taste receptor (Nature 2002, DOI 10.1038/nature726).They employed an expression screening strategy, expressing putative G-protein-coupled receptors in human cells and assaying for stimulus-induced changes in intracellul

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Telomeres and Fanconi's anemia

By | March 1, 2002

Telomere breakage and replicative shortening account for telomere shortening in Fanconi 's anemia.

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