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Creating kingdoms

By | November 7, 2000

Analysis of four conserved proteins allows a better prediction of eukaryotic phylogeny.

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Life after ESTs

By | November 7, 2000

Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) have given researchers a quick if dirty look at the coding potential of the human genome. But now in the November Nature Genetics, Penn et al. use microarray experiments to conclude that the human genome project will uncover many genes not previously discovered by EST sequencing (Nat Genet 2000, 26:315-318). They scan 350 Mb of finished and draft human sequence using three different gene-finding algorithms. Open reading frames (ORFs) predicted by at least two of th

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HOUSTON. Amgen, the largest biotechnology company in the world, is funding research focusing on disorders that destroy parts of the nervous system. These include Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke. Medicines for disorders resulting from dysfunction of the neuroendocrine system such as obesity and Type 2 diabetes are also under development. In both areas, Amgen licenses product candidates and technologies that complement its internal drug discovery and develop

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New companies to commercialise neuroscience discoveries

By | November 3, 2000

Neurogenomics has significant commercial potential by way of gene targets for enhancement of brain function and treatment of brain-based disease.

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Fishy mutations

By | November 2, 2000

Transgenic animals carrying a prokaryotic vector are useful tools for mutation studies and the detection of spontaneous or induced mutations in different tissues. Advances in fish transgenesis make it possible to develop fish that can be used both to assess the health hazards of mutagens in aquatic environments and for comparative mutagenesis analysis. In a paper published online ahead of print in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Winn et al. report the use of a bacteriophage lamb

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Senior scientists promise to boycott journals

By | November 2, 2000

Leading scientists will refuse to publish, edit or subscribe to journals that do not make research articles available free of charge.

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Timing development

By | November 2, 2000

The Caenorhabditis elegans lin-4 and let-7 genes encode small RNAs that bind to complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated region of various developmental genes. Both genes control developmental timing, with let-7 driving a transition from late larval to adult cell fates. In the 2 November Nature, Pasquinelli et al. report that homologs of let-7 (but not lin-4) are found in a wide range of bilaterian animals, including flies, abalone, sea urchins, sea squirts, zebrafish, frog and human (Natu

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Bradycardia may promote coronary angiogenesis

By | November 1, 2000

Chronic bradycardia stimulates the formation of collateral vessels in patients with coronary artery disease, a small retrospective study has found.

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Brain imaging by scientists at the Institute of Psychiatry in London has revealed structural changes in the brain of schizophrenics, which could provide a means of identifying those people most at risk. This could enable doctors to diagnose schizophrenia before the onset of psychotic symptoms, and intervene before the condition takes hold.In a study published in November American Journal of Psychiatry, Dr Tonmoy Sharma and his team studied 37 patients who were experiencing their first episode of

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Genes reveal clue to meningitis B

By | November 1, 2000

to cause meningitis have been mapped.

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