Advertisement
Ingenuity
Ingenuity

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

New therapeutic signals in asthma

By | January 5, 2001

Blocking IL-5 or adding IL-12 can lower the number of eosinophils in mild asthma but has no effect on hyper-responsiveness.

0 Comments

The sexually transmitted disease chlamydia has been strongly linked to cervical cancer in a study carried out by scientists in Finland. Chlamydia trachomatis accounted for 24,311 new infections in men and 32,544 in women in 1999. However, because most cases show no symptoms, the actual number could be 90% greater. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that women infected with the chlamydia strain serotype G were nearly seven times more likely to develop c

0 Comments

Spinal axons regeneration

By | January 5, 2001

Replacing key growth cone components GAP-43 and CAP-23 could be an effective way to stimulate regeneration of spinal axons.

0 Comments

A reason for neurone death

By | January 4, 2001

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited disease in which spinal cord neurones die for no known reason. The disease is inevitably fatal in childhood due to an inability to breathe or swallow. Michael Sattler and colleagues from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany points out that the neurones' death may be caused only by a change in the binding structure of "survival of motor neurone" (SMN) protein (Nat Struct Biol. 2001 8: 27-31). Researchers identified the thre

0 Comments

Brain cancer independent of cellular phones

By | January 4, 2001

The use of handheld cellular telephones is not associated with risk of brain cancer according to a paper published in JAMA (JAMA 2000 284:3001-3007).Between 1994 and 1998, Dr Joshua Muscat and colleagues from New York conducted a case-controlled study on the effects of cellular phones in 5 US academic medical centers. They interviewed 469 patients with primary brain cancer and 422 matched controls. They found that the median monthly hours of cellular telephone use was 2.5 for cases, not statisti

0 Comments

Cosmic radiation and leukaemia

By | January 4, 2001

Deletion or loss of the long arm of chromosome 7 in myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukaemia could indicate previous exposure to ionising radiation, says Dr Maryanne Gundestrup from the University of Copenhagen (Lancet 2000; 356: 2158). This finding can be used as a marker for an increased risk of acute myeloid leukaemia due to increased exposure to radiation in persons, such as aircrew members exposed to cosmic radiation or patients after radiotherapy. Researchers studied the karyotype of sev

0 Comments

Stop in the name of ethics

By | January 4, 2001

A French research team is criticised for allowing a clinical trial to continue even though preliminary results suggested the drug therapies were ineffective.

0 Comments

Developing nations to receive low-cost access to research information

By | January 3, 2001

WHO pilots an initiative to give developing nations access low-cost internet access for scientific information.

0 Comments

Fluoroquinolones may reduce the risk of myocardial infarction

By | January 3, 2001

Antibiotic treatment for infections of Chlamydia pneumoniae has been associated with protection against myocardial infarction, probably via a stabilizing effect on the cytoskeleton of endothelial cells and on chondrocytes in humans. Dr Herings et al from the Netherlands decided to test this association through a case-control study to see whether patients receiving antibiotics for Chlamydia pneumoniae infections were less likely to have been admitted for a first acute MI (JAMA 2000 284:2998-2999)

0 Comments

Mummy's been given a toe job?

By | January 3, 2001

Research of human remains in the necropolis of Thebes-West suggests that ancient Egyptians were the pioneers of amputation and prosthetic surgery (Lancet 2000; 356: 2176-79).Professor Andreas Nerlich and colleagues from Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany, investigated the mummified remains of a woman aged about 50-55 who died between 1550 and 700 BC. Close pathological examination revealed that her right big toe had been amputated during her lifetime, because an intact layer of soft

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews
Life Technologies