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Sanger Institute looks to the future

By | November 5, 2001

Following the completion of the first draft of the Human Genome the Sanger Institute looks to the post-genomic future.

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a case of placement over policy?

By | November 2, 2001

The US anthrax outbreak has led to an unprecedented use of the antibiotic Cipro, but why not less precious drugs such as penicillin or doxycycline?

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Hammerhead selection

By | November 2, 2001

Hammerhead ribozymes with self-cleaving properties have been found in a range of organisms, including plants, newts, schistosomes and cave crickets. In the i November Nature, Salahi-Ashtiani and Szostak of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital describe an in vitro system to address the origins of hammerhead ribozymes (Nature 2001, 413:82-84).They used a DNA collection encoding large random-sequence RNAs to select self-cleaving RNAs. Repeated rounds of selection l

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Potassium ions move like Newton's balls

By | November 2, 2001

ion conduction mechanism across membranes.

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Unlocking the secrets of anthrax toxicity

By | November 2, 2001

Identification of the components of the anthrax toxin holds out hope for the rational drug design of a new generation of antibiotics.

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Anatomy and actions of microscopic agents of terror

By | November 1, 2001

A primer describing the fundamental biology and basis of toxicity of five of the organisms most likely to be used as bioweapons.

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Autocrine loops

By | November 1, 2001

Misregulation of autocrine signalling loops may contribute to cancer phenotypes. In November Nature Genetics, Thomas Graeber and David Eisenberg of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of California, Los Angeles describe a computer-based strategy to identify receptor-ligand pairs and autocrine loops in large datasets (Nat Gen 2001, 29:295-300).They compiled a Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) that is based on the published literature and contains 452 ligand-receptor p

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Identification of key cells in tumor growth

By | November 1, 2001

Recruitment of VEGF-responsive bone marrow-derived precursors is necessary and sufficient for tumor angiogenesis and growth.

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Ulcer healing with local gene therapy

By | November 1, 2001

The mechanism of gastroduodenal ulcer healing involves angiogenesis but the exact roles of molecules such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) in this process remain unclear. In November Gastroenterology, Michael Jones and colleagues from University of California, Irvine, California show that gene therapy with a single local injection of naked DNA encoding VEGF and angiopoietin-1 can accelerate ulcer healing.Jones et al. induced ulcers in rats and then injected

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Chemotactic blockbuster

By | October 31, 2001

Dictyostelium discoideum cells display a strong chemotactic response to cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), mediated by a cell surface receptor and G protein-linked signaling pathway. In October 26 Science, Masahiro Ueda and colleagues from Osaka University, Japan, show the first real-time images of how single fluorescent-labeled cAMP molecules bind to their receptors on living Dictyostelium amoebae.Ueda et al. used an objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscope to

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