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First link between air pollutants and birth defects

By | January 10, 2002

Pregnant women exposed to high levels of air pollution have increased likelihood of neonatal cardiac defects.

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Natural remedy for vision loss

By | January 10, 2002

Pathological angiogenesis can cause loss of vision and is associated with many diseases of the eye for which there exists no effective treatment. In January 8 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, two papers by teams from The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, USA, described the unexpected antiangiogenic activity of a fragment of the human protein tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS), a molecule also known to be involved in protein synthesis and cell proliferation. Atsushi Otani an

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Stretch DANCE

By | January 10, 2002

Extracellular elastic fibers are central to effective organ function, but the molecules that control the formation of these elastic fibers remains unclear. Two papers in January 10 Nature showed that the protein called fibulin-5 (also known as DANCE) is an elastin-binding protein essential for in vivo elastic fiber development.Hiromi Yanagisawa and colleagues from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre, Dallas, observed that fibulin-5 knockout mice developed marked elastinopathy owing t

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Systematic proteomics in yeast

By | January 10, 2002

Large-scale purification and mass spectrometry has been used to characterize hundreds of multiprotein complexes in yeast.

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Numerous genetic and environmental factors are thought to be responsible for the development of atherosclerosis, but the role of pathogens in this process remains unclear. In January 1 Circulation, Christine Espinola-Klein and colleagues at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany, demonstrated a strong association between viral and bacterial pathologic burden and the extent of atherosclerosis (Circulation 2002, 105:15-21).Espinola-Klein et al. analyzed the presence and extent of periphe

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Deoxygenated ballast water restores balance

By | January 9, 2002

The discharge of ballast water collected from one region into the ecosystem of another has long been recognized as a major environmental problem. In January Biological Conservation, Mario Tamburri and colleagues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute show that deoxygenating ballast water can prevent the introduction of exotic invasive species and also reduce ship corrosion (Biological Conservation 2002, 103:331-341).Investigations by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., showed that ballast w

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SMaRT correction

By | January 9, 2002

Gene therapists have developed a RNA-mediated technique for correcting gene defects that cause cystic fibrosis.

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Better intelligence for the battle of the bulge

By | January 8, 2002

Identification of the factor that stimulates fat cell development could help fight obesity and diabetes.

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Deadly termite trap

By | January 8, 2002

A carnivorous pitcher plant uses a fringe of edible white hairs to lure and trap termites in large numbers.

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GM pigs could fill transplant gap

By | January 8, 2002

Genetically modified pigs could provide organs for transplant that are not rejected by the immune system.

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