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GM pigs could fill transplant gap

By | January 8, 2002

Genetically modified pigs could provide organs for transplant that are not rejected by the immune system.

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Variation on the fourth

By | January 8, 2002

The fourth chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster was believed to be free from variation and meiotic recombination, leading to several theories about its selection and evolution. In the January 4 Science, Wen Wang and researchers at the University of Chicago challenge these theories with their discovery of regions of variation along the chromosome (Science 2002, 295:134-137).They analysed nucleotide sequence around the toy gene locus from many fly collections worldwide. The observation that there

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Damage in worms

By | January 7, 2002

Combined functional genomics approaches help to identify novel genes involved in the DNA damage response pathway in nematodes.

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p53 controls ageing

By | January 7, 2002

The p53 protein works to suppress cancer cells by the induction of senescence, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but its role in the longevity of organisms remains unknown. In 3 January Nature, Stuart Tyner and colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA, show that p53 has a role in controlling ageing in mice.Tyner et al. generated mice with a mutation that confers phenotypes consistent with activated p53. They found that mutated mice are highly resistant to tumors but display early

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Uncoupling protection

By | January 7, 2002

Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are molecules that usually generate heat in the mitochondria of brown adipose tissue, but their function in other tissues remains unclear. In 3 January Nature, Karim Echtay and colleagues from the Medical Research Council's Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, UK, show that UCPs may have a role in decreasing reactive oxygen species concentrations inside mitochondria.Echtay et al. observed that superoxide increases mitochondrial proton conductance through effects on UC

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A surprising substitution

By | January 4, 2002

Transcription factor component JunB, although less active than Jun, has the potential to substitute functionally for Jun.

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Evidence that the heart can regenerate

By | January 4, 2002

Undifferentiated host cells can migrate to host donor tissue in transplanted hearts.

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Monkey map

By | January 4, 2002

Following the completed draft of the human genome sequence, there is renewed interest in the genetic differences between species and, particularly, in what makes us human. In 4 January Science, Asao Fujiyama and colleagues at the RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Japan present a first-generation human-chimpanzee comparative genome map (Science 2002, 295:131-134).They used over 77,000 chimp bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) and aligned end-sequences with the human genomic sequence. The BAC clon

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Pea style protein import

By | January 4, 2002

Pea chloroplast protein transporter crystal structure reveals a novel GTPase involved in transmembrane protein import.

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Miniature genome

By | January 3, 2002

The 'Year of the Genome' ended with the publication of a tiny genome, that of the marine chordate Oikopleura dioica. Oikopleura is a small pelagic chordate that measures just 5mm. It is easy to culture and has a short life cycle (2-4 days) and high female fecundity (around 300 oocytes). In 21 December Science, Hee-Chan Seo and colleagues reported the genome sequence of O. dioica (Science 2001, 294:2506).They used large-scale shotgun sequencing to assemble contigs covering 32.6 Mb. The total geno

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