News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Study points to new genetic model for disease

By | September 27, 2001

Biedel syndrome, a classically Mendelian genetic disease is triallelic.

0 Comments

Viral discovery

By | September 27, 2001

The isolation of novel viral genomes from serum or plasma samples presents a significant technical challenge. In the September 25 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Tobias Allander and colleagues at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, USA, describe a sensitive method for identifying viruses in serum samples (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:11609-11614).The method is based on the fact that viral genomes are generally protected from DNase degradation

0 Comments

A link between Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease

By | September 26, 2001

The proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease interact to enhance each other's distinct degenerative effects

0 Comments

Minos in mammals

By | September 26, 2001

Transposon-based technology for insertional mutagenesis of the genome has been widely used in Drosophila and could be adapted for genomic analysis in mammals. Minos is a mobile element of the Tc1/mariner superfamily isolated from Drosophila hydrei. In the September 25 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Zagoraiou et al. report the use of Minos transposons in mouse tissues (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:11474-11478).They generated two transgenic mouse lines: one expressing the Mino

0 Comments

Modifying DiGeorge

By | September 26, 2001

Analysis of a mouse model for DiGeorge syndrome suggests that genetic modifiers affect the disease phenotype.

0 Comments

Wave of schizophrenic brain loss uncovered

By | September 26, 2001

Schizophrenic teenagers undergo a wave of grey matter loss that envelopes increasing amounts of the cortex throughout adolescence.

0 Comments

A fish a day keeps the doctor away

By | September 25, 2001

Changes in the diet of the Inuit people of Nunavik, Canada, help explain the beneficial effect of n-3 fatty acids on the key risk factors of cardiovascular disease.

0 Comments

Red squirrels in Britain

By | September 25, 2001

Red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) thrive in the north of England and Scotland and occupy a patchwork of highly fragmented woodland habitats. In the September 21 Science, Marie Hale and colleagues from the University of Newcastle, UK, report a genetic investigation of the impact of habitat fragmentation on British red squirrel populations (Science 2001, 293:2246-2248).They assembled over 100 squirrel samples collected between 1918 and 2000 and analysed four polymorphic microsatellite loci for each

0 Comments

US agreement clarifies the use of stem cells in research

By | September 25, 2001

Agreement enables basic stem cell research to continue but bans diagnostic or therapeutic applications.

0 Comments

Cod origins

By | September 24, 2001

Identifying the population origins of individual fish is important in assisting the policing of fishing waters and the tracking down of poachers. In the September 20 Nature, Einar Nielsen and colleagues from the Danish Institute for Fisheries Research describe a simple approach using microsatellite markers to assign individual Atlantic cod fish (Gadas morhua) to their original population (Nature 2001, 413:272).They studied three cod populations; from the North Sea, the Baltic Sea, and the northe

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Top 10 Innovations 2016
    Features Top 10 Innovations 2016

    This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

  2. Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease
  3. Pubic Hair Grooming Linked to STI Risk
    The Nutshell Pubic Hair Grooming Linked to STI Risk

    Observational study suggests pubic hair grooming correlates with heightened risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections, although causation remains unclear.

  4. Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue
Rockland