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An oncogene with a split personality

By | August 29, 2001

oncogene could play an important role in the next generation of cancer treatments.

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Cocaine addiction linked to a glutamate receptor

By | August 29, 2001

A previously overlooked glutamate receptor expands our understanding of the neurological basis of learning and addiction.

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Regulating p53

By | August 29, 2001

MDM2 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates the activity of p53 by controlling degradation of the p53 protein, as a result of differential addition of ubiquitin. In the Advanced Online Publication of Nature Genetics, Parant et al. report the phenotype of mice lacking the recently cloned MDM2-related protein MDM4 (DOI:10.1038/ng714).They show that mdm4-null mice die at embryonic day 7.5-8.5. Analysis of the incorporation of the nucleotide analogue BrdU and TUNEL staining for apoptotic cells sho

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Consequences of patrilocality

By | August 28, 2001

Patrilocality (in which a woman moves to her mate's residence upon marriage) and matrilocality (in which women stay put and the men move) should be reflected in intra- and inter-group differences in the diversity of Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA sequences, inherited from the father and mother, respectively. In the Advance Online Publication of Nature Genetics, Oota et al. put this to the test by comparing Y-chromosome and mtDNA diversity in three matrilocal and three patrilocal tribes in no

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DOCK2 controls lymphocyte migration

By | August 28, 2001

The exit of lymphocytes from the vasculature is essential for the control of the inflammatory response. Cell migration involves cytoskeletal dynamics controlled by Rac GTPases but the full molecular mechanism remains unknown. In August 23 Nature, Yoshinori Fukui and colleagues from Kyushu University, Japan, show that DOCK2, a haematopoietic cell-specific protein, mediates cytoskeletal reorganization via Rac activation and is indispensable for lymphocyte chemotaxis.Fukui et al. studied DOCK2-defc

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Hazards of aging

By | August 28, 2001

In the August 28 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Michelle Hamilton and colleagues, at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center, have addressed the question 'Does oxidative damage to DNA increase with age?' (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:10469-10474).They set out to confirm the 'oxidative stress hypothesis' which postulates that aging results from the irreversible accumulation of oxidative damage. They isolated nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from multipl

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Multiple functions of the Kras2 oncogene

By | August 28, 2001

oncogene suppresses lung tumor formation and progression in mice.

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African elephants

By | August 24, 2001

African elephants are often considered to represent a single species, Loxodonta africana, which is distinct from the Asian elephant genus Elephas. In the August 24 Science, Alfred Roca and colleagues from the US National Cancer Institute challenge this assumption by presenting their results of a phylogenetic analysis of African elephants (Science 2001, 293:1473-1477).They collected dart-biopsy samples from almost two hundred free-ranging elephants from 21 populations and sequenced 1732 nucleotid

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Specialized skeletal structures enable brittlestars to 'see'

By | August 24, 2001

Brittlestars are marine echinoderms that characteristically have five long, thin arms radiating from a disc-shaped body. In August 23 Nature Joanna Aizenberg and colleagues at Bell Laboratories/Lucent Technologies, New Jersey, The Weizman Institute of Science, Israel and the Natural History Museum, Los Angeles describe the structure of unusual skeletal structures that could act as a compound eye.Despite having no eyes it has long been observed that brittlestars of the genus Ophiocoma wendtii can

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The molecular signature of prostate cancer

By | August 24, 2001

The use of cDNA microarray screening is enabling more accurate analysis of prostate tissue for signs of abnormality.

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