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Lining-up Listeria genomes

By | October 26, 2001

Listeriosis is caused by the ingestion of pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes in contaminated food. In the October 26 Science, Glaser et al. report a comparative analysis of Listeria genomes aimed at identifying virulence genes (Science 2001, 294:849-852).They sequenced the genomes of two Listeria strains; pathogenic L. monocytogenes EGD-e and a non-virulent species L. innocua.L. monocytogenes contains a single circular chromosome of 2.9 Mb, while L. innocua has a 3 Mb chromosome and an 80 kb plas

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A comment from Genome Biology

By | October 25, 2001

Sixteenth century prayer, attributed to Thomas Nashe

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Anthrax evildoers revealed

By | October 25, 2001

New work has identified the cellular receptor for anthrax toxin and resolved the crystal structure of a component of the toxin.

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Salmonella

By | October 25, 2001

There are about 16 million cases of typhoid fever throughout the world each year. In the October 25 Nature, Parkhill et al. report the complete genome sequence of the pathogenic culprit, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18 (Nature 2001, 413:848-852). The drug-resistant strain has a genome of 4.8 Mb containing over two hundred pseudogenes, some of which correspond to virulence genes in Salmonella typhimurium.In the same issue of Nature, McClelland et al. report the sequence of the Salmonella e

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Eliminating research fraud

By | October 24, 2001

The Committee on Publication Ethics calls for the establishment of a medical research watchdog.

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Lucky Luke

By | October 24, 2001

It is believed that the evangelist Luke was born in Antioch in Syria and died in Thebes, Greece, around 150 C.E (AD). His body was transported to Constantinople (Turkey) in 338 C.E. and later transfered to Padua, Italy. In the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cristiano Vernesi and colleagues at the University of Ferrara, Italy, describe experiments to verify the origins of the Padua body (doi/10.1073/pnas.211540498).They followed strict guidelines to isolate

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Pregnancy, p53 and breast cancer risk

By | October 24, 2001

The age at which a woman becomes pregnant could influence whether she subsequently develops breast cancer.

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Programmable synthetic microenvironments for transplant cells

By | October 23, 2001

Fetal stem cells assembled with cell-adhesive and controlled-release microparticles form transplantable neo-tissues, mimicking the microenvironment of developing tissue.

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Studying disease associations

By | October 23, 2001

In the Advanced Online Publication of Nature Genetics, John Ioannidis and colleagues at the University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece, describe a study to determine the reliability of disease association and genetic linkage reports (DOI:10.1038/ng749).They assembled data from published reports of 36 different disease associations, ranging from schizophrenia to hypertension. They used meta-analysis to explore the diversity and discrepancies between different studies. In 39% of c

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Bigger, better pancreatic cells

By | October 22, 2001

cells to grow larger and produce more insulin.

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