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DNA vaccination against autoimmune disease

By | September 22, 2000

Studies on rats show that vaccination with naked DNA can provide protective immunity from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

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FAS-cinating proteomics

By | September 22, 2000

Comprehensive proteome analysis offers a powerful tool to move beyond the genome. In a study published online ahead of print in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Gerner et al. (J. Biol. Chem., published online 7 September 2000) describe the use of high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis to investigate changes to 1000 protein spots following Fas-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphocyte cells. Gerner et al. used a range of techniques including metabolic radiolabelling, subc

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How Hydras get their heads

By | September 22, 2000

The expression of Wnt signaling proteins in the head organizer of Hydra, a freshwater polyp, suggests that Wnt was central in the evolution of axial differentiation.

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Beyond the ban on human embryo research: An Italian way?

By | September 20, 2000

In the context of a heated debate on human embryo research, some Italian researchers are looking for a scientific way through the moral and ethical minefield.

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Intravascular radiotherapy prevents arterial restenosis

By | September 20, 2000

An international trial has shown that intravascular radiotherapy can prevent artery re-narrowing after stent implantation.

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Women's rights could lower population growth

By | September 20, 2000

report published today, the United Nations Population Fund has delivered a devastating attack on the world's unequal treatment of women.

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Headache and heart disease

September 19, 2000

Some patients with episodic headaches could have myocardial ischemia.

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Interfering nonsense

By | September 18, 2000

Worm proteins required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay are also required for maintenance of RNA interference.

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Lasker Awards presented for work on ubiquitination and hepatitis C

By | September 18, 2000

The 2000 Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards, announced in New York on September 17, will put further pressure on the Nobel Foundation to grant a Nobel Prize for work related to the cell cycle.

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Race relations gone cuckoo

By | September 18, 2000

Cuckoos lay eggs that mimic the eggs of other bird species; those eggs are then looked after by the unsuspecting foster parent. Cuckoos have been divided into races based on the identity of the egg type that the females mimic. In the 14 September Nature Gibbs et al. report that only female cuckoos observe 'race' boundaries (Nature 2000, 407:183-186). Mitochondrial DNA, which is passed solely through the female line, occurs in race-specific haplotypes. But nuclear DNA, which segregates through bo

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