News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

ADAMs cut into heart failure

By | December 31, 2001

Cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive response to an increase in blood pressure which, despite initial benefits, leads to heart failure and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In January Nature Medicine, Masanori Asakura and colleagues from Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka, Japan show that shedding of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) by ADAM12 plays an important role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy.Asakura et al. found that in cultured rat

0 Comments

Fresh heart for red wine drinkers

By | December 31, 2001

Seasonal science suggests that red wine does you good and that the bubbles in champagne do go to your head.

0 Comments

Inflammation 'stop' button

By | December 28, 2001

The mechanisms that control the termination of the mammalian inflammatory response in vivo remain unclear. In 20/27 December Nature Akio Ohta & Michail Sitkovsky from National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA show that G-protein-coupled A2a adenosine receptors have an essential role in the attenuation of inflammation and tissue damage in vivo.Ohta & Sitkovsky studied mice deficient in the A2a adenosine receptor and observed that sub-threshold doses of an inflammatory stimulus caused

0 Comments

Molecular benefits of red wine

By | December 28, 2001

Red wines strongly inhibit the synthesis of endothelin-1, a vasoactive peptide that is crucial in the development of coronary atherosclerosis.

0 Comments

Interferon gamma's other face

By | December 21, 2001

Suppressing interferon gamma or the entire immune system is unlikely to be the best way to treat autoimmune diseases.

0 Comments

Primitive microbe enlightens evolution

By | December 21, 2001

Single-celled choanoflagellates have a unique receptor tyrosine kinase that may be linked to the origin of multicellular animals.

0 Comments

The ship of the desert's pharmaceutical cargo

By | December 21, 2001

The smaller antibodies of the camel could help fight human viral diseases and cancer.

0 Comments

Three-spined sticklebacks

By | December 21, 2001

The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteusaculeatus) is a teleost fish that has undergone rapid adaptive evolution and speciation within the last 15,000 years. The benthic species has greatly reduced body armour, increased body depth and fewer gill rakers than the limnetic species, which more closely resemble an ancestral marine fish. In the December 20/27 Nature, Peichel et al. report the generation of a genome-wide linkage map for G. aculeatus (Nature 2001, 414:901-905).They collected 1,176 cl

0 Comments

Wishing you a myrhhy Christmas

By | December 21, 2001

The Three Wise Men may have delivered a gift that just keeps on giving.

0 Comments

Death domains, dysplasia and development

By | December 20, 2001

locus encodes a death-domain adaptor protein associated with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS