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Beware a conflict of interest

By | August 23, 2001

has asked contributors to declare potential conflicts of interest, including disclosure of sources of funding.

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goes live on the Internet

By | August 23, 2001

genome is now freely available on the web.

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MAPK signaling in psoriasis

By | August 23, 2001

Psoriasis is characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and increased expression of integrins, but the pathological signaling pathway remains unknown. In August 15 Journal of Clinical Investigation, Ingo Haase and colleagues from the Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London, UK show that activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway by integrins, either directly or through increased IL-1 production, is responsible for epidermal hyperproliferation in psoriasis and wound hea

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Prostate markers

By | August 23, 2001

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. In the August 23 Nature, Saravana Dhanasekaran and colleagues from the University of Michigan Medical School describe the use of cDNA microarrays to define 'signature' gene-expression profiles for human prostate cancer (Nature 2001, 412:822-826).They compared the expression levels of almost ten thousand genes in benign and malignant prostate cancer samples, compared with normal adjacent prostate tissue. Clustering analysis revealed di

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Absolute BlyS

By | August 22, 2001

Insights into the function of the B-lymphocyte cytokine BAFF/BlyS and its receptors have come from mutant mice.

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Sonic hedgehog maintains adult stomach structure

By | August 22, 2001

In adult tissues Shh is a negative regulator of gastric gland cell proliferation and controls the expression of gut epithelial differentiation.

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Telomerase helps mend broken hearts

By | August 22, 2001

Cardiac muscle regeneration after injury is limited by 'irreversible' cell cycle exit via down-regulation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). In the August 21 online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Hidemasa Oh and colleagues from the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, show that mice genetically engineered to overexpress TERT produce more and bigger cardiac myocytes, which live longer than those in normal mice.Oh et al. modified mice to express TER

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Charities and governments tackle clinical research crisis

By | August 21, 2001

New initiatives in the UK and US aim to create an environment more conducive to enabling doctors to train as 'physician-scientists'.

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Copper shows mettle in preventing food poisoning

By | August 21, 2001

Using copper surfaces for food preparation could reduce the risk of food poisoning.

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Polar fish provide biological antifreeze molecules

By | August 21, 2001

Synthetic analogues of antifreeze glycoproteins could be used to prolong the 'shelf-life' of organs awaiting transplant.

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