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Sequence of a big bug

By | September 4, 2000

, the bug responsible for most cystic fibrosis deaths, reveals lots of pumps and lots of regulation.

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Cardiologists expand definition of MI

By | September 1, 2000

Transatlantic coalition of cardiologists redefine infarction so that severe angina may now be called a heart attack.

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Dairy bacteria could treat inflammatory bowel disease

By | September 1, 2000

LONDON, September 1 (SPIS MedWire). A new treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been developed involving a bacterium used in the manufacture of dairy products. Scientists at the Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology genetically modified Lactococcus lactis to produce anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10). Administered orally in mice, the strain appeared to prevent and even cure chronic IBD. Conventional treatments administered orally or by injection are hindered bec

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mapped

By | September 1, 2000

Understanding its antibiotic resistance may save the lives of many cystic fibrosis sufferers.

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Alendronate increases bone mineral density in men, which could reduce the number of fractures and the need for surgery.

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NEW YORK, Aug 31 (Praxis Press). Pregnancy is associated with in-creased susceptibility to malaria but whether this persists after pregnancy has not been investigated. To address this, Diagne and colleagues monitored residents of a village in Senegal where the rate of malarial transmission was high, and assessed exposure to malaria, parasitemia, and morbidity, from June 1, 1990, to December 31, 1998. They analyzed 71 pregnancies in 38 women from the year before conception through one year after

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A dictionary for genomes

By | August 31, 2000

With sequence information in hand, the search for regulatory sites in promoters can be done by computers rather than cloning. But the primary tools for analysis, multiple-alignment algorithms, can only handle a small amount of sequence data. In the August 29 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Bussemaker et al. introduce an alternative algorithm that they dub 'MobyDick' (Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 2000, 97: 10096-10100). MobyDick treats DNA sequence as text in which allthewordshavebeenru

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The new European Life Sciences Organization (ELSO) is starting with great hopes but a shoestring budget and few members.

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Statins may promote angiogenesis in animals

By | August 31, 2000

Capillary formation in ischemic limbs may be a beneficial side effect for normocholesterolemic patients.

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Universal cancer vaccine being developed

By | August 31, 2000

Inhibiting the telomerase enzyme, present in most cancers, may prevent cell division but some scientists warn of "more harm than good."

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