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The end of HIV-1 budding machinery

By | October 8, 2001

HIV-1 reprograms the cellular machinery and employs several unknown host proteins to bud from infected cells. In 5 October Cell, Jennifer Garrus and colleagues from University of Utah School of Medicine and Myriad Genetics, Salt Lake City show that the human tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101), which functions in vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) pathway, is critical to HIV-1 budding and the progression of the disease into full-blown AIDS.Garrus et al. used small interfering RNA to stop producti

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The nitroproteome

By | October 8, 2001

Protein nitration at tyrosine is associated with dozens of pathologies, including transplant rejection, cancer and Parkinson's disease. In the October 9 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Kulzant Aulak and colleagues at The Cleveland Clinic describe the use of proteomics to explore protein nitration events during inflammatory challenge (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:12056-12061).They used a well-characterized monoclonal antibody recognizing nitrotyrosine to detect nitrated protei

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The Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine 2001

By | October 8, 2001

Leland Hartwell, Timothy Hunt and Sir Paul Nurse awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of key regulators of the cell cycle.

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is a key signal for cancer treatment

By | October 5, 2001

signaling in T cells.

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The ADAMTS family

By | October 5, 2001

A deficiency in a member of the ADAMTS family of zinc metalloproteinases causes thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

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Watch your language!

By | October 5, 2001

Several studies have suggested that there may be a genetic component to developmental disorders of speech and language, but no specific genes have been identified. In the October 4 Nature, Cecilia Lai and colleagues at the University of Oxford report mutations in a gene that correlates with such language disorders (Nature 2001, 413:519-522).Study of a family (called KE) with speech-language disorder led to the mapping of the SPCH1 locus on chromosome 7. Lai et al. performed fluorescence in-situ

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Cannabinoid protects injured brain

By | October 4, 2001

No effective drug currently exists to treat brain injury and the mechanisms that control post-trauma events remain largely unknown. In October 4 Nature, David Panikashvili and colleagues from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, show that the cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) is part of an endogenous system that protects the brain in the period following traumatic injury.Panikashvili et al. observed that after closed head injury in mice the level of endogenous 2-AG was significantly eleva

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Fat-busting protein

By | October 4, 2001

The protein 4E-BP1 converts white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue and consequently reduces obesity.

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Lack of confidence in the MMR vaccine affects immunization rates

By | October 4, 2001

report into a possible link between MMR and autism has resulted in fewer children being immunized.

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Plague genome

By | October 4, 2001

Yersinia pestis is a Gram-positive bacterium that has wreaked havoc for centuries by causing plague pandemics such as the Black Death. Threats that Y. pestis could be used as a biological warfare agent suggest that it will continue to provide a healthcare challenge in the future. In the October 4 Nature, Parkhill et al. from The Sanger Centre report the complete genome sequence of the Y. pestis strain CO92 (Nature 2001, 413:523-527).The killer genome consists of a 4.65 megabase chromosome and th

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