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Genetic classification of lung tumors

By | November 22, 2001

DNA microarray studies of crudely dissected lung tumors can detect tumor subtypes that correlate with biological and clinical phenotypes.

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Radiation resistance

By | November 22, 2001

A screen of diploid yeast mutants has identified over a hundred genes involved in the response to ionizing radiation.

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Fly SNPs

By | November 21, 2001

genome will accelerate the rate of positional cloning in flies.

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Microbial biology to yield biomedical harvest

By | November 21, 2001

New initiatives launched by the US Department of Energy aim to extract practical benefits from the vast amount of microbial genomic data available.

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Molecular control of sleep

By | November 21, 2001

Levels of cAMP and cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB) control the balance between rest and wakefulness.

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Cholesterol keeps HIV-1 production healthy

By | November 20, 2001

HIV-1 multiplication requires the presence of cholesterol-enriched microdomains, in the plasma membrane of host cells.

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Hemoglobin and malaria

By | November 20, 2001

Hemoglobin C alleles are associated with protection from malaria in West Africa.

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Radiotherapy with targeted nanogenerators

By | November 20, 2001

The use of a safe, efficient, highly specific carrier capable of delivering radioactivity precisely with in a tumor is a long sought after goal in the treatment of cancer. In November 16 Science Michael McDevitt and colleagues from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York describe a new efficient method to target molecular-sized generators of alpha-emitting isotopes to the inside of cancer cells.McDevitt et al. constructed a nanogenerator of alpha-emitting particles from a single atom of

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The piscidin adventure

By | November 20, 2001

Antimicrobial peptides exist in the epithelial tissues and blood cells of many vertebrates, but no antibiotic has been isolated from the mast cells of any animal. In November 15 Nature Umaporn Silphaduang and Edward Noga from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, US identified a family of peptide antibiotics that reside in the mast cells of fish. These 'piscidins' suggests that mast cells may participate in direct killing of microbial invaders.Silphaduang & Noga used tissues derived from

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Bacterial networking

By | November 19, 2001

Conjugation has classically been considered a bacterium-to-bacterium DNA transfer driven by the donor cell and is typically plasmid-encoded. Theoretically it is possible that any type of cell can serve as the recipient. In December Nature Genetics, Virginia Waters from the University of California, San Diego shows the first evidence for bacterial conjugation to mammalian cells.Waters used the RK2 'shuttle vector' plasmid system to determine if Escherichia coli can transfer a fluorescent DNA sign

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