Advertisement

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Gene profiles in developing worms

By | January 17, 2001

Only 8% of the 18,967 genes in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome have been extensively studied using biochemistry or genetics. In the January 2 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Jiang et al. constructed microarrays with nearly every C. elegans gene to profile expression throughout development (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:218-223). They compared gene expression in six developmental stages from eggs to adult worms. Around two thirds of genes were found to vary during developm

0 Comments

How things get complicated

By | January 17, 2001

Pre-biotic evolution created something almost infinitely unlikely to have arisen by chance: reproducing entities whose many parts interact in a way that is vastly more complex and interdependent than the disorganized interactions of the inanimate objects in the surrounding environment. And yet this creation of primitive organisms was all achieved in perhaps a few hundred million years. In the January 16 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Jain and Krishna use mathematical modeling t

0 Comments

Matrix modulation in monocytes

By | January 17, 2001

The interactions of cells with the extracellular matrix (ECM) are critical for orchestrating immune and inflammatory responses. In the December Immunity, de Fougerolles et al. report a comprehensive analysis of gene expression profiles affected by the attachment of monocytes to fibronectin and other ECM components (Immunity 2000, 13:749-758). They used a quantitative, restriction enzyme-based profiling method, named GeneCalling, to examine the integrin-mediated induction of genes in the monocy

0 Comments

New model for HIV infection proposed

By | January 17, 2001

Two strains of HIV have been discovered that attack the immune system in a new way, according to research published in the January issue of Nature Medicine. It was previously thought that HIV largely affects CD4+ T cells, leaving CD8+ cells relatively untouched. Although two HIV strains from infected CD8+ cells had previously been isolated, it was not known whether their structures were different from those of strains that infect CD4+ cells.In the new research, Saha and colleagues show that neit

0 Comments

US National Institutes of Health to increase emphasis on minorities

By | January 16, 2001

To increase research on minority health problems, the US government has established the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities.

0 Comments

Another candidate gene for asthma?

By | January 15, 2001

There are several chromosomal regions where asthma-associated genes are known to be located. These include a region on the long arm of chromosome 3 that is linked with other immune system related diseases such as Crohn's or systemic lupus erythematosus.In research published in the January issue of European Respiratory Journal, Koichiro Asano and colleagues from Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, examined the DNA sequence of a gene in this region of chromosome 3 that encodes a chemokine r

0 Comments

Fetal tolerance

By | January 15, 2001

Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) activity protects the foetus by suppressing T-cell-driven local inflammatory responses to foetal alloantigens.

0 Comments

Gene discovery awakens interest in sleep disorder

By | January 15, 2001

Researchers from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City have identified the genetic component of Familial Advanced Sleep-Phase Syndrome (FASPS), the inherited form of Advanced Sleep-Phase Syndrome (ASPS), which affects around one third of the elderly population. People with the rare FASPS, which was discovered in 1999, tend to fall asleep at about 7pm and awake spontaneously at 2am and 4am.In research published in the online version of Science, Toh et al. examined a large family that suffers fro

0 Comments

How melanomas avoid apoptosis

By | January 15, 2001

Many cancers become resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs thanks to loss of the p53 protein, which promotes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to certain drugs. Metastatic melanomas are unusual in that, despite their chemoresistance, they retain functional p53. In the January 11 Nature, Soengas et al. find that these melanomas still lose the p53 pathway thanks to deletion and methylation of the p53 effector Apaf-1 (Nature 2001, 409:207-211). The Apaf-1 locus shows over 40% loss of heteroz

0 Comments

How to get hot

By | January 15, 2001

The same duplication event arises in multiple lines of bacteria as they adapt to heat.

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Biology Research
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist