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Plasma renin and leptin in hypertension

By | August 17, 2000

Plasma renin and leptin are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

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Changing times at the OST

By | August 16, 2000

Sir Robert May, outgoing UK Chief Scientist, spoke to Robert Walgate about treading the fine line between government and the science community, and the changing face of science in the UK and Europe.

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Cancer incidence is lower in patients taking HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors than in patients taking bile acid sequestrants.

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Kidney transplantation

August 16, 2000

Gender disparity in kidney transplantation persists in an equal-access setting.

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Vaccination and asthma

August 16, 2000

Influenza vaccination does not exacerbate asthma in children.

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Can't get there from here

By | August 15, 2000

In the 10 August Nature, Burch and Chao find that two populations of an RNA virus, derived from a single ancestral phage, repeatedly evolve towards different fitness maxima (Nature 2000, 406:625-628). The average fitness of one of the final phage populations is actually lower than that of the starting clone, suggesting that the original individual was at the peak of a local maximum of fitness. The existence of these different and non-overlapping solutions to maximizing fitness suggests that the

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Destruction before salvation

By | August 15, 2000

Mouse models of cancer are primarily soft tissue sarcomas and lymphomas, whereas 90% of human cancers are epithelial in origin. In the August 10 Nature, Artandi et al. suggest that the difference arises from higher levels of telomerase (the enzyme that adds a protective cap on the end of chromosomes) in mice (Nature 2000, 406:641-645). When the researchers combine a mouse telomerase knockout with a mutation in the tumor suppressor p53, non-reciprocal translocations appear, followed by epithelial

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Black-blood MRI

By | August 14, 2000

A new MRI technique may identify vulnerable atheromatous plaques likely to rupture.

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NEW YORK, Aug 10 (Praxis Press) Small studies have shown that many children born as extremely preterm infants suffer from neurologic and developmental disabilities, but confirmation by a large-scale study has been lacking. To address this issue, Wood and colleagues conducted a prospective study of all infants born at 20 through 25 completed weeks of gestation in the United Kingdom and Ireland during a 10-month period beginning in March 1995. They measured development, neurologic function, and oc

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Stenting and fibrinolysis

By | August 14, 2000

Stenting plus abciximab gives better clinical outcome than thrombolysis after acute MI.

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