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Acute coronary events more likely at beginning of menstrual cycle

By | December 1, 2000

Almost three-quarters of acute cardiac events in premenopausal women occur between days one and five of the menstrual cycle.

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Patients with Down's syndrome can still feel the pain

By | December 1, 2000

Individuals with Down's syndrome feel pain, even though they react to it more slowly.

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Caught in the act

By | November 30, 2000

In the 30 November Nature, Kopp et al. report that altered regulation of the bric-a-brac (bab) gene drove the evolution of sexually dimorphic pigmentation in Drosophila (Nature 2000, 408:553-559). The fifth and sixth abdominal segments (A5 and A6) of male Drosophila melanogaster are fully pigmented, whereas those of the female or of males of many other Drosophila species are only partially pigmented. The D. melanogaster males discriminate strongly against females with extra pigmentation, so the

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Neural transplantation for Huntington's disease

By | November 30, 2000

Transplanted foetal neurons can improve human brain activity in patients with Huntington's disease.

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Potential vaccine for Ebola virus

By | November 30, 2000

A vaccine that protects monkeys against Ebola virus has been developed but there's still some way to go before a human version is available.

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Searching for nuclear localization signals

By | November 30, 2000

Nuclear localization signals (NLSs) are motifs that mediate the transport of proteins to the nucleus, but finding an NLS within your protein of interest can be tricky. In the 15 November EMBO Reports (EMBO Reports 2000, 1:411-415), Cokol et al. describe an 'expert database' of NLSs, created by collecting 91 experimentally determined NLSs and extending the dataset by 'in silico mutagenesis'. They initially increased the database by adding homologous proteins, and then analyzed sets of proteins wi

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Drug metabolites can now be patented

By | November 29, 2000

HOUSTON Bristol-Myers Squibb Company unveiled both a scientific achievement and a patent strategy that, if used by other drug companies, could delay introduction of cheaper generic versions of hundreds of patented drugs. Typically, after patents expire and generic versions of a drug become available, most drugs lose up to 80% of sales during the first year they face generic competition, according to Barbara Ryan, a drug industry analyst with Deutsche Banc Alex Brown. US patents on drugs with sal

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Potential AIDS epidemic in Eastern Europe

By | November 29, 2000

Experts fear that Eastern Europe could experience an AIDS epidemic similar to that seen in Africa.

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Research explores development of babies' brains

By | November 29, 2000

Between the ages of six and eight months, babies' brains go through a crucial stage of development that allows them to begin to make sense of objects.

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Gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

By | November 28, 2000

An adeno-associated viral vector has successfully been used to deliver truncated versions of the dystrophin gene in a mouse model for DMD.

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