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Parkinson's disease not restricted to the brain

By | September 5, 2000

LONDON, September 5 (SPIS MedWire). Parkinson's disease may not be restricted to the brain; it could also cause the loss of nerve terminals in the heart, according to new research. Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), Maryland, USA, carried out positron emission tomography scans on 29 Parkinson's disease patients. Nearly all had reduced numbers of norepinephrine-producing nerve endings in the heart. This decrease was not related to whether the patien

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Cholesterol levels drop after myocardial infarction

By | September 4, 2000

A recent study suggests that lipids should be measured routinely on admission in acute coronary syndromes.

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Creating protein folds

By | September 4, 2000

An exon, the basic unit of DNA that gets shuffled around during evolution, has an average coding capacity of 40 amino acids, or roughly half of a small folded protein domain. Exon exchange between homologous proteins can lead to slightly altered proteins, but in the August 29 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Riechmann and Winter ask whether shuffling between unrelated sequences can generate new folds (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2000, 97:10068-10073). Their starting material is DNA enc

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Keep taking the pills

By | September 4, 2000

The placebo effect may lead to a significant skew in clinical trials of heart treatments.

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Promiscuity in Trinidad

By | September 4, 2000

Female Trinidadian guppies often mate with multiple males, because the resultant offspring show substantially increased fitness.

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Sequence of a big bug

By | September 4, 2000

, the bug responsible for most cystic fibrosis deaths, reveals lots of pumps and lots of regulation.

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Cardiologists expand definition of MI

By | September 1, 2000

Transatlantic coalition of cardiologists redefine infarction so that severe angina may now be called a heart attack.

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Dairy bacteria could treat inflammatory bowel disease

By | September 1, 2000

LONDON, September 1 (SPIS MedWire). A new treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been developed involving a bacterium used in the manufacture of dairy products. Scientists at the Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology genetically modified Lactococcus lactis to produce anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10). Administered orally in mice, the strain appeared to prevent and even cure chronic IBD. Conventional treatments administered orally or by injection are hindered bec

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mapped

By | September 1, 2000

Understanding its antibiotic resistance may save the lives of many cystic fibrosis sufferers.

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Alendronate increases bone mineral density in men, which could reduce the number of fractures and the need for surgery.

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