Advertisement
Sigma-Aldrich
Sigma-Aldrich

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Potential vaccine for Ebola virus

By | November 30, 2000

A vaccine that protects monkeys against Ebola virus has been developed but there's still some way to go before a human version is available.

0 Comments

Searching for nuclear localization signals

By | November 30, 2000

Nuclear localization signals (NLSs) are motifs that mediate the transport of proteins to the nucleus, but finding an NLS within your protein of interest can be tricky. In the 15 November EMBO Reports (EMBO Reports 2000, 1:411-415), Cokol et al. describe an 'expert database' of NLSs, created by collecting 91 experimentally determined NLSs and extending the dataset by 'in silico mutagenesis'. They initially increased the database by adding homologous proteins, and then analyzed sets of proteins wi

0 Comments

Drug metabolites can now be patented

By | November 29, 2000

HOUSTON Bristol-Myers Squibb Company unveiled both a scientific achievement and a patent strategy that, if used by other drug companies, could delay introduction of cheaper generic versions of hundreds of patented drugs. Typically, after patents expire and generic versions of a drug become available, most drugs lose up to 80% of sales during the first year they face generic competition, according to Barbara Ryan, a drug industry analyst with Deutsche Banc Alex Brown. US patents on drugs with sal

0 Comments

Potential AIDS epidemic in Eastern Europe

By | November 29, 2000

Experts fear that Eastern Europe could experience an AIDS epidemic similar to that seen in Africa.

0 Comments

Research explores development of babies' brains

By | November 29, 2000

Between the ages of six and eight months, babies' brains go through a crucial stage of development that allows them to begin to make sense of objects.

0 Comments

Gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

By | November 28, 2000

An adeno-associated viral vector has successfully been used to deliver truncated versions of the dystrophin gene in a mouse model for DMD.

0 Comments

History matters

By | November 28, 2000

A return to ancestral conditions can result in evolutionary reversal, but it is not inevitable.

0 Comments

Minos mutagenesis

By | November 28, 2000

In the 15 November EMBO Reports Klinakis et al. describe a method for insertional mutagenesis and gene tagging that uses transposon-mediated mutagenesis (TRAMM) (EMBO Reports 2000, 1:416-421). They used two plasmid vectors, one encoding the Minos transposase enzyme from Drosophila hydrei and the other carrying a drug-resistance gene flanked by Minos inverted repeats. The naked DNA plasmids were transfected into human HeLa cells and about 4% of cells gave drug-resistant clones with multiple inser

0 Comments

Raised haemoglobin levels linked to increased risk of stillbirth

By | November 28, 2000

High levels of haemoglobin during early pregnancy have been linked to an increased risk of stillbirth. Dr Olof Stephansson and colleagues from Stockholm's Karolinska Institute reviewed more than 700 women who had had a stillbirth. Those with haemoglobin levels of 146g/L or higher at their first antenatal appointment appeared to be almost twice as likely to have a stillbirth compared with women who had normal levels. This link seemed to be stronger still after adjusting for stillbirths that occur

0 Comments

Green is go, red is stop

By | November 27, 2000

A mutant fluorescent protein that changes from green to red over time can indicate when transcription is turned on and off.

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Biology Research
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement