News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

p53 mediates pregnancy protection against breast cancer

By | October 19, 2001

A pregnancy early in reproductive life is protective against breast cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that form the basis for this protective effect have not been elucidated. In the October 16 early online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Lakshmi Sivaraman and colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, showed that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is increased in early pregnancy in rats and mice, possibly explaining why early pregnancy is associated

0 Comments

T cells can stop development of skin cancer

By | October 19, 2001

Gamma-delta T cells in the skin use evolutionarily conserved proteins to negatively regulate malignancy.

0 Comments

The future's bright, the future's online

By | October 19, 2001

The resignation of an entire editorial board over journal access adds further impetus to the online publishing revolution.

0 Comments

$38 million glue grant to explore cell migration

By | October 18, 2001

An international consortium of scientists from a number of disciplines have been brought together to investigate how cells move.

0 Comments

Regulation of host responses by a bacterial peptide

By | October 18, 2001

ribosomal protein fragment may contribute to lymphocyte dysfunction in gastric adenocarcinoma.

0 Comments

Wild olives

By | October 18, 2001

Domestication and cultivation have resulted in the generation of wild-looking forms of Mediterranean fruit crops derived from cultivated plants (cultivars). In the October 18 Nature, Roselyne Lumaret and Noureddine Ouazzani describe a genetic hunt for genuinely wild olives in forests of the Mediterranean (Nature 2001, 413:700).They collected samples from ten forests (40 trees per forest) in seven countries around the Mediterranean basin, scored them for allozyme markers, and compared them with t

0 Comments

abo

By | October 17, 2001

Mutation of the Drosphila gene abnormal oocyte (abo), causes a recessive maternal-effect lethality, which can be rescued by specific regions of heterochromatin. In the October 9 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Maria Berloco and colleagues report a characterization of the abo protein product and its function (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:12126-12131).Berloco et al. cloned the abo gene and showed that it encodes a chromosomal protein that binds specifically to the regulatory re

0 Comments

New drug target boosts hopes for stroke therapy

By | October 17, 2001

Plant-derived chemicals may help protect neurons from metabolic stress following stroke.

0 Comments

Reopening the debate on the origins of vCJD

By | October 17, 2001

A new epidemiological study suggests that variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease may have developed independently of animal spongiform encephalopathies.

0 Comments

Controlling the cell cycle clock

By | October 16, 2001

Using a novel DNA extraction method, the proteins that control the cell cycle regulatory proteins have been identified.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS