News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Gene profiling of immune communications

By | September 3, 2001

Early after bacterial invasion dendritic cells express IL-2, providing activation signals greatly enhancing both T and B cell responses.

0 Comments

Setback for UK Synchrotron facilities, as new head takes over

By | September 3, 2001

The closure of the Daresbury synchrotron for emergency repairs emphasises the need for more of these facilities.

0 Comments

Transplastomic tomatoes

By | September 3, 2001

Plastid genome engineering has created transgenic tomatoes, paving the way for the development of appetizing edible vaccines.

0 Comments

Uncovering the secret to human longevity

By | August 31, 2001

One or more genes on chromosome 4 seem to influence who will live to a ripe old age.

0 Comments

Viral killer

By | August 31, 2001

The ability to selectively kill cells lacking normal p53 activity is an attractive anti-cancer strategy. In the August 30 Nature, Kenneth Raj and colleagues from the Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC) suggest that adeno-associated virus (AAV) could be employed as a 'hired assassin' (Nature 2001, 412:914-917).They found that AAV induced apoptosis of p53-deficient osteosarcoma cells, but induced cell-cycle arrest (in G2 phase) in cells expressing p53. None of the proteins enc

0 Comments

Not much in common

By | August 30, 2001

A comparison of the Celera and Ensembl transcriptomes examines how many predicted genes they have in common.

0 Comments

The first tissue specific angiogenic mitogen

By | August 30, 2001

VEGF is a newly identified molecule that is an angiogenic mitogen selective for endocrine gland endothelium.

0 Comments

An alternative for toll pathway

By | August 29, 2001

Toll-like receptor 4 uses the TIRAP cytoplasmic adapter protein as an alternative route to induce immune responses.

0 Comments

An oncogene with a split personality

By | August 29, 2001

oncogene could play an important role in the next generation of cancer treatments.

0 Comments

Cocaine addiction linked to a glutamate receptor

By | August 29, 2001

A previously overlooked glutamate receptor expands our understanding of the neurological basis of learning and addiction.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham