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Many ways to make a breast tumor

By | August 21, 2000

In the 17 August Nature Perou et al. present a DNA microarray analysis of 65 human breast tumor specimens from 42 different individuals (Nature 2000, 406:747-752). Of the 8,102 genes analyzed, 1,753 varied in abundance at least fourfold in at least three samples. These genes could be clustered into groups that correlated with mitotic index, regulation of the interferon pathway, and the relative abundance of endothelial cells, stromal cells, adipose cells, B or T cells and macrophages. Expression

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Preventing artery damage during angioplasty

By | August 21, 2000

Balloon catheters could be coated with ceramide to prevent damage to arteries.

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Xena: small cloned piglet

By | August 21, 2000

On 2 July 2000, a small black piglet was delivered by a white sow. Xena's dark color was a clue that she was not the warrior princess whose name she bears but the product of the first successful pig cloning from fetal cells. As reported in the 18 August Science, this cloning adds to reports of cloned sheep, cattle, and goats (Onishi et al, Science 2000, 289:1188-1190). Xena was produced using a technique developed in mice in which a nucleus from a somatic cell is microinjected into an enucleated

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Therapeutic cloning to become a reality for Britain

By | August 18, 2000

The potential therapeutic benefits of research on human embryos areenormous and outweigh the ethical and safety concerns, the UKgovernment decided this week.

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2D gels are not enough

By | August 17, 2000

A series of narrow-pH-range overloaded 2D gels, processed using sensitive silver-staining, yields enough spots that the gels could, theoretically, be surveying virtually all of the proteins of budding yeast. But in the August 15 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Gygi et al. report that proteomics proponents may have been fooling themselves (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2000, 97:9390-9395). Gygi et al. select a random region of one such gel and analyze all the visible spots. The genes co

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A sea urchin genome project

By | August 17, 2000

Sea urchins are popular in developmental biology research thanks to their well defined embryology, the ease of gene transfer into eggs, and the abundance of eggs for biochemical work. Now the sea urchin genome project is off to a start with sequence from the ends of 76,020 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) recombinants. In the August 15 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cameron et al. report that these sequence tag connectors (STCs) occur at an average of 10 kb apart in the s

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Choosing hearts to treat

By | August 17, 2000

A TIMI prognostication scheme is clinically useful in cardiac patients.

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Coronary risk factors

August 17, 2000

NEW YORK, Aug 15 (Praxis Press) Ultrasound measurements of carotid arterial intimal-medial thickness, a measure of atherosclerosis, are increasingly used as cardiovascular endpoints in clinical studies, but the association of carotid atherosclerosis and major coronary risk factors is unknown. Mannami and colleagues evaluated the relationship between major coronary risk factors (hypertension, smoking, and hypercholesterolemia) and ultrasound measures of carotid atherosclerosis in 3,998 Japanese m

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How you got that clot

By | August 17, 2000

Elevated plasma factor VIII predicts recurrent venous thromboembolism.

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Hysterectomy

August 17, 2000

NEW YORK, Aug 14 (Praxis Press) Women are routinely cautioned about the immediate risks of serious complications and death associated with elective hysterectomy, but are often not counseled about the possible long-term sequelae. Brown and colleagues reviewed 12 articles that addressed the development of incontinence in women after hysterectomy; eight were cross-sectional studies, two were prospective cohort studies, one was a case-control study, and one was a randomized controlled trial. Overall

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