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in trans

By | February 16, 2001

Experiments with irradiated mice show that damage to DNA in the paternal genome is hazardous for the maternally derived genome.

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Influenza virus propagation curbed

By | February 16, 2001

Drugs that inhibit a key signalling pathway in the human cell can halt the propagation of the influenza A virus.

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Mosquito MITEs

By | February 16, 2001

Study of the mosquito genome is driven by the need for improved strategies to control the transmission of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases. In the February 13 Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Tu describes the use of a novel computer program, FINDMITE, to search systematically for DNA transposable elements in the genome of the African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:1699-1704). The program identified eight novel families of miniature inv

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A single gene drives endocrine pancreatic development

By | February 15, 2001

pancreatic islet cells.

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B help surgeons?

By | February 15, 2001

B in neutrophils may predict the risk of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome after major surgery.

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Inflammatory bowel disease linkage with chromosome 3p

By | February 15, 2001

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of conditions having an unknown cause, but with a genetic component clearly demonstrated by epidemiological and linkage studies. A link with chromosome 3 is suggested by observations of a gene, or perhaps multiple genes, involved in regulating immune function and inflammatory response that reside in this region of the genome.In the February issue of Gut, a team from the US, UK, Germany and the Netherlands published the results from a high resolution li

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GM crops not likely to become 'super-weeds'

By | February 14, 2001

A long-term study shows the four GM crops tested are not more invasive or more persistent than their non-GM counterparts.

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Why too much sex isn't good in the long run

By | February 14, 2001

when you're a ram, that is.

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Pneumococcal vaccine protects children from otitis

By | February 13, 2001

The frequent ear infections suffered by some infants during the first two years of life can be difficult to treat. Most are caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, also responsible for chest infections in adults and for which there is already a vaccine. A team from the National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland tested the efficacy of the new conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in children and found that it can also be effective in the prevention of ear infections (N Engl J Med 2001, 344:403-409)

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Pressure for cheaper AIDS drugs increases

By | February 13, 2001

res at a daily treatment cost of less than one dollar.

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